The Farm / Scott Posno Design

first_img Houses “COPY” Structural Engineer: Photographs:  Double Space Photography Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Blackwell Structural Engineers Projects The Farm / Scott Posno Design Builder: ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/891111/the-farm-and-daughters Clipboard The Farm / Scott Posno DesignSave this projectSaveThe Farm / Scott Posno Design House Design:Scott Posno DesignProject Design Lead:Darcy HannaDesigner & Spd Principal:Scott PosnoMillworker:Lakeland InteriorsCity:ClaringtonCountry:CanadaMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Double Space PhotographyRecommended ProductsWindowsFAKRORoof Windows – FPP-V preSelect MAXWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalWoodTechnowoodPergola SystemsText description provided by the architects. Located an hour east of Toronto, The Farm occupies a 65-acre site amidst the peaceful green fields of this Southwestern Ontario agricultural region, adjacent to a large conservation forest. It serves as a weekend and vacation home for the client, his grown children, and a variety of friends and family who frequent the tranquil property for relaxation and enjoyment year-round, away from the hustle and bustle of the city.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographySave this picture!Ground Floor PlanSave this picture!© Double Space PhotographyComprised of several buildings and structures spread over the property amidst a plethora of natural landscape features, The Farm aims to engage the history and physical attributes of the site while amplifying a relationship with the outdoors. The main house sits atop a shallow ridge and follows a north-south orientation, with the primary longitudinal elevation facing east to capture morning light and a compelling view of the property’s rolling hills, dense thicket of trees, and the lush Ganaraska Forest beyond. An existing pond concentrates activity downslope; continuing on, a winding stream that bisects the property is a calming presence, shaded by the surrounding trees. Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographyThe main house is set back 200 feet from a dead-end gravel road, accessed from an L-shaped driveway leading to the long bar of a building. Its steeply gabled form and exaggerated length suggest a modern interpretation of the vernacular longhouse typology. Extending 153 feet from garage to master suite, the house is clad in cedar siding stained a soft charcoal, a perfect complement to the varied greens, browns and greys of the foliage, bark and rock comprising the landscape. A standing-seam metal roof is perfectly matched in colour, with deep overhangs at either end.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographyHere, the longhouse form translates into an even distribution of program from public to private functions in a sequential fashion. Additional privacy is maintained through the separation of sleeping quarters: the luxurious double-height master suite enjoys a privileged position with southern orientation and a secluded patio, while the other two bedrooms are located on the second floor of the house. Further, a separate loft space above the garage functions as both an artist’s studio and self-contained guest suite.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographyMultiple points of entry ensure a degree of permeability along the home’s considerable length: the front entrance on the west elevation is balanced on the east by an operable window wall connecting interior living space with the generously scaled outdoor patio, capitalizing on the verdant and seemingly limitless view. At the north end, the dining room occupies the full 22-foot width of the house and offers a flexibility of function: when the sliding glass pocket doors on either side are closed, the room is a warm, intimate space for gathering; when the doors are slid open, it becomes a breezeway—not merely an outdoor room, but a conduit linking front and back, interior and exterior, east and west.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographySave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Double Space PhotographyA restrained material palette defers to the power of the dramatic site conditions, allowing the simplicity of form and the subtleties of light and shadow to inflect the project. Polished concrete floors in the public areas are balanced by an abundance of white oak used for millwork throughout, and for the stairs and flooring on the second level. The introduction of Douglas fir in the form of an expressed structural ceiling system is a reminder of the inherently rustic origins of the project.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographyThe Farm was not conceived of as a single iconic house in the country, but as a compound of buildings that engage the compelling qualities of site and landscape in such a way as to maximize use and enjoyment while establishing a greater connection to nature. Immediately adjacent to the garage at the north end of the house, a Zen Garden manifests as a perfectly square, semi-enclosed structure that is meant to encourage group or solitary activities such as yoga, meditation, reading or simply relaxing. The walls are defined by 2” x 4” ipe slats, and overhead, identically sized hollow aluminum members form an open trellis, offering partial protection and cover. Fifty feet south of the main house, a secondary zone focuses activity on an outdoor pool, hot tub and a sunken fire pit beneath another trellis. Small accessory sheds contain a sauna, pool equipment and mechanical functions, and a separate, enticingly compact cabana mirrors the form and materiality of the main house—a perfectly proportioned additional one-bedroom guest suite should the need arise.Save this picture!© Double Space PhotographyLocated some 220 feet east of the main house, the pond exerts a magnetic and gravitational pull down the gentle slope of the site. By day, it is a scenic and intrinsic aspect of the property, inhabited by small wildlife creatures who are drawn to its life-giving properties. By night, in the darkness, stargazing becomes a favoured nocturnal activity for those comfortably ensconced in the Adirondack chairs that ring the adjacent stone fire pit. Beyond the leafy grove of trees east of the pond, the sight and sound of the stream offers a surprising reward; two wooden bridges connect either side of the bank, inviting exploration and a deep contemplation of the mysteries of the forest.Project gallerySee allShow lessMAD Architects’ Harbin Opera House Through the Lens of Andres GallardoArchitecture NewsWhich Architecture Firms Are Building the Most in New York City?Architecture News Share Interior Design: Canada Den Bosche & Finchley Manufacturers: Carl Hansen, Delightfull, Jasper Morrison, Molo Design, Hans Hopfer, Naoto Fukasawa, Sebastian Herkner &Daughters Area:  4000 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Year:  Save this picture!© Double Space Photography+ 27Curated by María Francisca González Share 2017 Photographs Architects: Scott Posno Design Area Area of this architecture project CopyHouses•Clarington, Canada ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/891111/the-farm-and-daughters Clipboard CopyAbout this officeScott Posno DesignOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesClaringtonCanadaPublished on March 25, 2018Cite: “The Farm / Scott Posno Design” 25 Mar 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesVinyl Walls3MExterior Vinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StoneShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectDoorsRaynorGarage Door – Advantage SeriesConcreteSika3D Concrete PrintingSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Bre-ClassSkylightsVELUX CommercialModular Skylights in Atelier Zimmerlistrasse OfficeWindowsswissFineLineSliding Windows in Villa LakesideSuspension SystemsMetawellAluminum Panels for Smart CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Printing in Roofs & CanopiesSound BoothsFrameryMeeting Pod – Framery Q – Flip n’ FoldWall / Ceiling LightsAsaf WeinbroomLighting – Linestra 110 BrassMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Holler Star Saul Williams Proves Colbert is Not a Racist

first_img View Comments Stephen Colbert is on a Broadway bender! After having Audra McDonald on to perform a couple of signature tunes from Lady Day, slam poet and Holler If Ya Hear Me star Saul Williams stopped by The Colbert Report on May 1. He discussed his work as a spoken word artist as well as talking about the upcoming tuner, which features the music of the late rapper Tupac Shakur. Williams who, as we learn, did not have to beat out a hologram Tupac for the role, explains that while the musical is not biographical, “the story is now; the music is Tupac.” He continues, saying, “Tupac’s music was made for this.” Take a look at the hilarious interview below, and learn how Colbert “has done more to end racism than Barack Obama.” Related Shows Holler If Ya Hear Me Show Closed This production ended its run on July 20, 2014last_img read more

The renovated complex of Dubrovnik Lazarets has opened its doors

first_imgAs part of the final conference of the project “Lazareti – the creative district of Dubrovnik”, on Sunday, July 28, the grand opening of the renovated historic complex Lazareti was organized. Now, after a thorough renovation, Lazareti has received a new life cycle through the valorization of cultural heritage as a place of cultural and tourist facilities. Mihaela Skurić, director of the Institute for Reconstruction of Dubrovnik, the main partner in the project, emphasized that this is the first project of the City of Dubrovnik in which funds from European funds are invested in the restoration of cultural heritage and giving new function and purpose, ie life to heritage. local communities.  The Lazareta complex, located right next to the city walls in Ploče, the eastern entrance to the historic center, in the past served as a quarantine (French quarantine: forty days), an international anti-infective measure that separates and controls people, goods and means of transport (ships) they are suspected to come from infected areas. In Dubrovnik, as early as 1377, the Grand Council issued a provision according to which newcomers from plague areas had to spend a month in certain supervised locations before they were allowed to enter the city. Although there have been several quarantines in Dubrovnik throughout history, Lazareti (whose construction was completed in 1647) was the largest commercial transit center on the Adriatic and one of the best organized quarantines in the Mediterranean in the 17th century. In the past, the eastern suburb of Ploče was a meeting place for trade caravans and travelers from the Ottoman Empire. Therefore, as early as 1377, the first quarantine for the isolation of passengers and goods from eastern countries was built in Ploče, because epidemics of infectious diseases often prevailed.  The infirmaries, with 8 preserved buildings and 5 courtyards, were renovated in 1623 from the sea side so that larger ships could approach. They had spacious warehouses for goods and livestock, and rooms for longer stays of merchants and travelers in isolation. In the 17th century, Dubrovnik’s Lazareti was the largest commercial transit center on the Adriatic and one of the best organized quarantines in the Mediterranean.  The project is worth HRK 33,8 million, of which as much as HRK 25,9 million was provided from European Union grants through the European Regional Development Fund. HRK 21.078 was spent on the renovation of three previously unrestored ships, while other funds were intended for equipping seven ships that have already been renovated, as well as for developing and designing cultural programs and facilities. As the future cultural center of Dubrovnik, Lazareti fully fit into the vision of sustainable destination management and through the valorization of cultural heritage sites and the expansion of cultural and tourist facilities is expected to make a major contribution to sustainable development at the local and regional level. In addition to the City of Dubrovnik, ten other partners participated in the project – the Institute for the Reconstruction of Dubrovnik, DURA, the Dubrovnik Tourist Board, the Linđo Folklore Ensemble, the Lazareti ART Workshop, the Lero Student Theater, the DEŠA Association, the DEŠA Social Enterprise and the Dart Association, and Art Sebastian Design. “The opening of the Lazaret is seemingly a small step for our city, but it is extremely important and full of symbolism. It is the year 2019 of culture, when we celebrate many anniversaries and we can finally say – Lazareti are over. We know how and in what way to take care of our historical heritage, we have EU funds at our disposal and we have just shown that we know how to use them, that we know how to manage EU money and invest it in what is important, and that is caring for our heritage. It is up to us to move on”, Said Mayor Mato Franković at the opening of the Lazaret. Source / photo: City of Dubrovniklast_img read more