Mind the Gap

first_img August 3, 2017 597 Views Most hardworking Americans already know about the gender pay gap. But recent data reveals there is a certain type of company that could be giving working women fairer wages. However, the gap has only lessened.According to a new analysis by real estate database Redfin, and PayScale, a company that gathers data of individual salary profiles, the gender pay gap is half the size at technology companies with more women executives.To determine these findings, Redfin examined the gender makeup of executive teams at 31 of the largest U.S. technology companies. PayScale then analyzed 6,562 salary profiles of people who reported working for these companies between June 2015 and 2017.Based on this conducted research, it was discovered that companies with more women executives have a two-cent pay gap. So for every dollar men earn, women earn 98 cents. While a mere two pennies might not sound like much, it adds up. In fact, the study noted that this inequality adds up to tens of thousands of dollars over a woman’s career.While the gap has only narrowed, it is notable that at least the issue is gaining attention. In 2015, Redfin decided to start publishing its pay gap and other diversity statistics as a way to encourage other companies to be transparent with its information, as well as hold itself accountable.”Increased transparency is one way we can work together to close the pay gap in our industry,” said Bridget Frey, Redfin CTO.However, the gender wage gap is just one challenge working women face with when it comes to issues of diversity. In a world once dominated by men, women continue to become trailblazers in the housing and mortgage industry. And each year, MReport magazine likes to celebrate these leading ladies in the industry with a special Women in Housing edition.Want to be one of MReport’s leading ladies? Know a female colleague that’s a groundbreaker for the industry? Click here. Deadline for inclusion is August 7. This issue is published in conjunction with the Five Star Institute’s Women in Housing Leadership Forum, the concluding event at the Five Star Conference and Expo, happening September 18-20, 2017, at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Dallas, Texas.To view all of Redfin’s data, click here. in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, Headlines, News Mind the Gapcenter_img Diversity gender gap HOUSING mortgage Payscale Redfin Women in Housing 2017-08-03 Nicole Casperson Sharelast_img read more

UVA research shows true nature of immune cells blamed in Alzheimers

first_img Source:https://newsroom.uvahealth.com/2018/06/25/understanding_microglia/ Jun 26 2018Immune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows.The discovery adds nuance and complexity to our understanding of immune cells known as microglia. By appreciating the role of these cells in full, scientists are better positioned to develop new treatments and tailor medicine to individual patients’ needs.”What we’re finding now is that at very acute time points, whether it’s in disease or whether it’s injury, the microglia are doing a lot,” said researcher Geoffrey Norris, PhD. “It’s important to know the role and function of these cells, especially going forward for human therapy.”Understanding MicrogliaNorris and colleagues in UVA’s Department of Neuroscience and its Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG) developed a new model that lets them study microglia in the context of acute injury. Researchers already knew that the cells play a critical role in brain development, but their role in adulthood was much murkier, with many scientists arguing their activity was harmful. UVA’s research reveals that injury to the central nervous system activates the microglia, and the cells respond with remarkable precision. “It seems that microglia are very responsive to the job at hand,” Norris said. “So rather than being good or bad, what we’re basically seeing is that they’re doing what they need to do.”He compared the cells to a construction crew knocking down a damaged building. “If you have a crumbling building after a house fire, you usually take the building away, right? You load it up on dump trucks and take it away,” he said. “That’s what the microglia are doing with this debris.”The research doesn’t rule out the possibility that the microglia could be too aggressive in their debris removal, or perhaps something could go wrong during removal and contribute to disease. To continue the house analogy, maybe the demolition crew is knocking down a slightly damaged kitchen rather than simply repairing it. “Whether the microglia activity is detrimental or not is really just starting to be teased out,” Norris said.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskFast Acting, Deep CleaningUVA’s new model allowed the researchers to observe as the cells swallowed up damaged material while leaving healthy cells untouched – strikes surgical in their precision. “If you look just a couple of microns away, their neighboring microglia are basically unresponsive,” Norris said. “So it’s a very contained area of activation, which was very interesting to us.”The researchers also noted how quickly the cells were changing and how quickly they cleared debris. Scientists working on treatments for neurological diseases may need to factor that in. Depending on the progression of a disease such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, “it might be that the microglia have already done a lot of work and you would need another approach,” Norris said.’A New Generation of Therapeutic Agents’Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, chairman of UVA’s Department of Neuroscience and director of the BIG Center, predicted the new understanding of microglia will have important ramifications.”Microglia were the neglected cells of the brain for decades,” Kipnis said. “The tide is changing, and we now realize how interesting and unique the biology of these cells is. This work shows the physiological response of microglia after CNS [central nervous system] injury, which is very different from their role in neurodevelopment or in chronic pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding microglia biology in physiology and pathology will bring us closer to development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for neurological disorders.”​last_img read more