Cartoon October 1, 2014

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Helicopter on way to Donegal crashed as pilot has lucky escape

first_imgA helicopter undertaking a flight to Donegal crashed upon take-off with the pilot managing to steer the chopper away from dangerous fuel tanks.The Eurocopter Hummingbird chopper was due to leave its base in Co Fermanagh on June 25th last.However, the pilot cheated injury when the helicopter crashed on its side as it left the ground. Details of the lucky escape have been published in a report released by the Air Accident Investigation Branch.The chopper was due to leave St Angelo Airport in Enniskillen before flying north towards Frosses in Co Donegal.However, the chopper was downed on lift-off and sustained damage to its skid gear, rotor blades, head, tailboom and horizontal stabiliser.Debris from the chopper was scattered over a wide area following the crash, according to the report. It also reveals how the pilot escaped uninjured.“The helicopter was parked on the apron adjacent to the fuel installation where it had just been refuelled to full tanks.“Having completed all the pre-start checks from the checklist and carried out a normal start, the pilot performed the pre-takeoff checks and raised the collective pitch lever. He led with right yaw pedal but, as the helicopter became light on the skids, it started to yaw to the left.“Due to the close proximity of the fuel storage tanks, he applied left cyclic control to move the helicopter to the left away from them, but the helicopter continued to yaw to the left. After yawing through 360°, the helicopter lost height with the left skid contacting the apron,” it adds.“The helicopter rolled about the left skid and the main rotor contacted the ground and debris was scattered over a wide area. “The helicopter continued to yaw through another 90° about the tail before rolling onto its right side.“The pilot shut off the fuel before applying the rotor brake and was able to leave the helicopter unassisted through the left door. The airport Rescue and Fire Fighting Service attended the scene immediately and applied a foam blanket to the wreckage,” the report form the AAIB adds.Helicopter on way to Donegal crashed as pilot has lucky escape was last modified: September 17th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:crashdonegalescapeFermanaghhelicopterpilotlast_img read more

E Cape farmers in ‘green’ dairy venture

first_img18 July 2011A newly established South African dairy company has taken the lead in milk processing, and boasts the smallest carbon footprint of any dairy in the southern hemisphere.The idea to establish a dairy with green credentials came about in 2010, when a group of Eastern Cape dairy farmers decided that they wanted to create a facility that could add value to locally produced milk. The farmers wanted to maintain the high quality of their products, but also had a vision to process milk using more eco-friendly methods.The Coega Dairy initially invested R50-million (US$7.3-million) in advanced ultra-high temperature (UHT) processing equipment that makes it possible to produce UHT milk, also known as long life milk, more efficiently.Coega Dairy CEO Dr Hennie Kleynhans said that no other dairy in the region or on the continent has invested in the advanced technology, known as OneStep, and internationally, he is only aware of a dairy in Spain that is using it.According to Kleynhans, this is because the technology is new in the market and besides being very expensive to install, would require dairies to undergo a complete overhaul of existing infrastructure.However, given the cost squeeze on dairy producers in South Africa, Coega Dairy deemed the investment worthwhile.Local trade magazine DairyConnect reports that South African milk producers face tough competition from countries where milk can be produced more competitively or where farmers receive subsidies. In South Africa, producers also have to contend with increasing input costs and low producer prices.The founders of the Coega Dairy realised that the technology could help them overcome some of these challenges: it allows for more eco-friendly milk production while also performing exceptionally on cost savings.Investing in the best green technologyCoega Dairy’s marketing director Marlize Smit said that the new UHT processing plant is significantly more efficient than conventional UHT equipment used in other South African plants.The Coega plant makes use of OneStep technology, which reduces the need for various steps during production. This means that milk can be processed faster, using fewer resources, at a lower cost.Energy and water consumption is considerably reduced, while the end products, which also include butter and custards, still maintain their high quality and have enhanced taste profiles.“The new plant is one of the most modern UHT plants, and one of the top green dairy plants in the world,” Smit said.The processing unit uses half as much energy, water and chemicals and generates 50% less effluent, of which 65% is recycled. The technology cuts carbon dioxide emissions by 40%, which results in a lower carbon footprint compared to world average values.According to Kleynhans, ordinary dairy plants use three litres of water to produce one litre of milk. In comparison, the OneStep technology makes it possible to use only 300ml of water per litre of milk. He noted that some dairies can use less water using traditional technology, but this is difficult as it requires extreme efficiency.Greening the dairy industryThe dairy industry struggles with eco-friendly operations. Production plants require daily cleaning, and this uses large quantities of water and chemicals. Cleaning chemicals are expensive and once used, are released in the effluent, which could harm the environment.“Many dairies do treat their water, but this is still not efficient,” said Kleynhans. Unlike traditional dairy plants, the OneStep technology design only requires cleaning every 60 hours, using fewer chemicals. This means less water and fewer chemicals, but an increase in production time, as less downtime has to be scheduled for cleaning.Establishing a green dairy and sourcing milk from farmers using eco-friendly farming methods is a step in the right direction for the local dairy industry. For the consumer, it also shows that farmers and the rest of the value chain know how important it is to produce food and beverages more sustainably.The switch to green technology anticipates changing consumer demands.“Eastern Cape dairy farmers are being pro-active. Consumers expect green products these days. It isn’t an option anymore,” said Smit.The farmers are also working towards greening the entire value chain, from the farm to the consumer.Smit said that the Coega Dairy will source milk predominantly from pasture fed cows raised in the province’s unpolluted surroundings.Coega Dairy products will be packaged in paper cartons, of which the majority can be reclaimed and recycled to make new paper products. The milk will also not be transported over long distances, which reduces the logistics and transport carbon emissions.Representative ownershipAt the moment 13 commercial milk farmers own the Coega Dairy, but next year the ownership structure of the company will change to ensure a benefit for all participants in the value chain.By 2012, dairy farm workers, black farmers and farm managers and factory workers will own 40% of the company’s shares.Additionally, said Kleynhans, the dairy will have a further positive economic impact on the Eastern Cape by creating 350 direct and 750 indirect jobs.Towards the end of 2011 when the plant becomes operational, milk will be sourced from black owned and managed dairy farms, many of which are highly successful.“These farmers milk over 25 000 litres of milk daily,” said Kleynhans. “Some also own close to 2 000 cows and on a properly managed farm, farmers can milk 15 to 20 litres of milk per cow per day.”Ownership of the company will be expanded further to include joint ventures with Amadlelo, a black empowerment agri-business concern, with the purpose of training black farm managers through shared milk production.Construction underwayThe Coega Dairy is currently under construction at the Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) just outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. It will be fully operational in October this year.Kleynhans said that with the infrastructure available, the road network and a reliable source of power at the Coega IDZ, it was the most suitable site for the new dairy.Extensive environmental impact assessments and relocation of vegetation, animals and insects were also undertaken before construction started.“Vegetation, animals, insects and even spiders, snakes and rats were relocated to a nearby site,” he said.Next year the Coega Dairy plans to install a second plant at the site. This will be valued at R192-million ($28.6-million) and will include value-adding equipment.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Energy Code Enforcement is a Mixed Bag

first_imgSince I am a HERS rater, I do the required testing for some builders and provide the test results for my building certification clients. Most of the houses I test pass; however, two recent homes did not. One house showed some bad duct leakage, which the HVAC contractor was able to identify quickly and repair.At the second house, the blower-door test showed almost 9 ach50. A quick inspection showed that an attic bonus room did not have the required attic-side sheathing on or blocking below the kneewalls. When they correct this, I will come back and retest. These are two cases where testing identified problems that could be fixed, but so far, there appears to be limited enforcement of the code by building officials.I see nothingIn my testing role, I am not responsible for overall compliance with the energy code, but I do my best to point out obvious problems, such as the missing air sealing of the knneewall mentioned above. But as long as a house passes the tests, I have no authority to report any work that doesn’t comply with code requirements.Unfortunately, it appears that many officials who are in a position to enforce the code are not doing so consistently. They require that the contractor post the state-required compliance certificate, but I have yet to see a project fail for missing the required air barriers that could be visually verified in a matter of minutes.This lack of enforcement allows builders to complete and sell homes that clearly don’t meet the requirements of the energy code, depriving homeowners of energy efficiency and comfort that they deserve. If enforcement were better and more consistent, all builders would have to step up their game and we would end up with much better housing stock.I recently served on a committee to help the city of Atlanta come up with a plan to properly enforce the energy code, with the intention of disseminating the results throughout the state when complete. The report is scheduled for release early next year. It will be interesting to see how successful this effort is at improving enforcement in the field. I’ve never been much of a code geek, but recently I’ve been studying the 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) documents. When I was a contractor, energy code enforcement by building officials was pretty much nonexistent, so I didn’t pay much attention to the specifics, although I’m fairly certain we met or exceeded the minimum requirements in our projects.My recent interest in the codes was sparked by Georgia’s amendments to the 2009 IECC that went into effect this year. The Department of Community Affairs put together a pretty thorough document that improves on the 2009 code and requires blower-door testing for new homes listed as an option in the IECC – one of the few in the country that does so. For reference, a house must test better than 7 ach50, and ducts must test to better than 8 cfm @ 25 Pa/100 s.f. total leakage or 12 @ 25 Pa/100 s.f. leakage outside the building envelope. Duct systems fully inside the building envelope don’t need to be tested and blower door testing is not required on renovation projects.More cops on the streetThere is a difference, however between having a good written code and enforcing it.There are two pieces to making sure that buildings meet the energy code: visually inspecting for the mandatory measures and performance testing. Visual inspections are the responsibility of building inspectors, while the testing can be done by anyone with the proper training – HERS raters or Duct and Envelope Tightness (DET) technicians who are trained to perform blower door and duct leakage tests by groups around the state. The testing does not need to be performed by a third party – the HERS rater or DET technician can be an employee of the builder, the HVAC contractor, or an independent contractor. RELATED STORIES Are Energy Codes Working?New Air Sealing Requirements in the International Residential CodeAn Overview of the 2012 Energy CodeAre We Really Better Off With Building Codes? last_img read more