Limerick medical card holders wrongly charged for blood tests

first_imgFacebook Previous articleLimerick men urged to mind their mental healthNext articleSisters, swing out to Limerick City Big Band Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live WhatsApp Advertisement Linkedin NewsLocal NewsLimerick medical card holders wrongly charged for blood testsBy Alan Jacques – December 12, 2015 922 TAGSblood testsCllr Maurice QuinlivanHSElimerickmedical cardsSinn Fein center_img Cllr Maurice Quinlivanby Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr Maurice QuinlivanA NUMBER of medical card holders in Limerick are being charged for blood tests by their GPs despite the fact they are entitled to this free service as part of existing service contracts with the HSE.People have contacted Sinn Féin General Election candidate for Limerick City, Cllr Maurice Quinlivan, in the last couple of weeks to express their confusion at being charged despite being eligible for free general medical services.Describing the charge as “absolutely unacceptable”, Cllr Quinlivan has advised those who had been charged that they are entitled to a full refund from the HSE.“A number of medical card holders have made contact with me to seek clarification and advice after being charged for blood tests. This is absolutely unacceptable as blood tests are free of charge to medical card holders as part of existing service contracts with the HSE and under the 1970 Health Act,” he explained.“I am quite shocked that this has been happening as I am aware that the HSE has written to contract holders a few times to clarify that the position with regards to phlebotomy services. That being said, I have also heard stories of posters being put up in some GP surgeries notifying all medical card patients that they will be charged €15 for blood tests from January 1 next.”Cllr Quinlivan insists that it is extremely important that the HSE communicates the position regarding provision of such services to contract holders.“This may have to be done more forcefully or with more clarity as it is clear that the message is not getting through in some cases. It has to be made very clear to all GPs that this not allowable or acceptable.“My foremost concern is for the welfare of medical card holder who are obviously not in a position to absorb the cost of such payments. Our GPs are a vital part of our communities. The vast majority have a very good understanding of their contractual obligations. However, it is clear that some, whatever the reasons may be, are not sticking to the terms of their contracts”, Cllr Quinlivan concluded.In response, the HSE told the Limerick Post that it has been made aware of instances where GPs have charged General Medical Services (GMS) patients inappropriately for phlebotomy (drawing blood) services. They have written to GP contract holders and clarified the position in relation to charging for phlebotomy.“A GP is expected to provide patients who hold a medical card or GP visit card with all proper and necessary treatment of a kind generally undertaken by a GP and not requiring special skill or experience of a degree or kind which GPs cannot reasonably be expected to possess.“A medical practitioner should not charge for these services or for travelling or for other expenses, premises, equipment or instruments in making the services available. In circumstances where the taking of blood is necessary, the GP may not charge that patient if they are eligible for free GMS services”.Medical card patients who feel they have been inappropriately charged for phlebotomy services can email [email protected] RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Twitter Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Printlast_img read more

Haitian-American artist honored

first_imgHaitian-American musician and record producer Wyclef Jean has been named 2010 Artist of the Year by the Harvard Foundation of Harvard University. The Grammy Award-winning musician will receive the group’s most prestigious medal at the annual Cultural Rhythms award ceremony on Feb. 27.The Harvard Cultural Rhythms festival will begin that day at 3 p.m. in Sanders Theatre. The award will be presented around 4 p.m. There also will be an 8 p.m. performance.“His contributions to music and distinguished history of creativity have been appreciated by people throughout the world,” said S. Allen Counter, director of the Harvard Foundation, “and he is admired worldwide for his humanitarian efforts on behalf of the people of Haiti.”Jean began his musical career as part of the Fugees, a hip-hop trio that rose to fame in 1996 with its second album, “The Score.” The multiplatinum record earned the group two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album.Jean launched his solo career in 1997 with “The Carnival,” which featured artists such as Célia Cruz and fellow Fugees Pras and Lauryn Hill. Praise for the multiplatinum album emphasized its musical influences, including hip-hop, reggae, folk, disco, soul, “Son Cubano,” and Haitian music. The album earned Jean three Grammy nominations, including Best Rap Album. He has since received three more nominations, including one for “Million Voices,” which also earned a 2005 Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Song in a Motion Picture (“Hotel Rwanda”).He is widely known for his humanitarian work through the Yéle Haiti Foundation, which promotes sports and the arts in Haiti. This support includes thousands of annual scholarships, soccer programs for at-risk youth, and free outdoor films in neighborhoods without electricity. The organization distributes food to communities in need throughout Haiti and mobilizes emergency disaster relief, including its current efforts in response to the devastating earthquake in the Port-au-Prince area.The Harvard Foundation, the University’s center for intercultural arts and sciences initiatives, honors the nation’s most acclaimed artists and scientists each year. Previous awards have been presented to such artists as Sharon Stone, Andy Garcia, Will Smith, Matt Damon, Halle Berry, Jackie Chan, Denzel Washington, Salma Hayek, and Herbie Hancock.For performance times and ticket information.last_img read more

Mining Stopped at Grand Canyon

first_imgBy prohibiting further mining in the Grand Canyon, the U.S. government is effectively protecting more than 1,300 acres from surface disturbance and preventing the diversion and potential pollution of over 300 million gallons of precious fresh water from the region’s aquifers.Dear EarthTalk: I understand that mining was just banned in the Grand Canyon and environs. Why is that an important victory for the environment?— Michael McAllister, Reno, NVYes, in January 2012 Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced that the federal government was prohibiting new mining claims for the next two decades across more than a million acres of public lands surrounding Grand Canyon National Park.In the face of increased uranium mining in the area, environmental advocates have been pushing for the prohibition to stave off the industrialization of the iconic wild lands flanking the park, fearing that new roads, mines, exploratory drilling, power lines and truck traffic would compromise the natural experience most visitors seek, let alone directly pollute and alter the region’s fragile ecology. Pre-existing claims can continue to operate in the parcels in question, but they will have only about a tenth of the surface impacts and a third of the water usage of what mining in the area would cause without the ban on new claims.“The Grand Canyon’s watershed is a complex groundwater flow system that extends miles north and south of the National Park’s boundary,” reports the non-profit Wilderness Society. “If contaminated by uranium mining, those aquifers would be impossible to clean up—a point acknowledged by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality.” The group adds that the aquifers in question feed the Grand Canyon’s springs and creeks, which provide habitat for up to 500 times more species than adjacent uplands, including threatened, endangered and even endemic species found only in the national park.“By industrializing the Grand Canyon region and risking permanent pollution of its soil and water resources, uranium mining would also threaten the Southwest’s robust tourism economy—for which Grand Canyon National Park is the primary economic engine,” says the Wilderness Society, adding that the outdoor recreation business in Arizona each year supports 82,000 jobs, generates some $350 million in state tax revenue, and stimulates about $5 billion in retail sales and services.As far as environmentalists are concerned, the Interior Department’s decision couldn’t have come any sooner, with mining companies chomping at the bit to open up over 700 new uranium mining sites and exploration projects on the disputed lands. By halting this development, the U.S. government is effectively protecting more than 1,300 acres from surface disturbance and preventing the diversion and potential pollution of over 300 million gallons of precious fresh water from the region’s aquifers.“The Interior Department’s decision on this ban reinforces the role the agency should play in managing our public lands by evaluating the various uses in the region and safeguarding fragile lands from permanent damage,” concludes the Wilderness Society.Of course, the mining and uranium industries in the U.S. are not lying down so easily. In February the National Mining Association, a trade group representing the interests of the U.S. mining industry, filed suit in federal court to try to overturn the prohibition. While the challenge works its way through the legal system, environmentalists can breathe easy as the ban remains in effect. But only time will tell how long they can keep resource extractors at bay in and around our national parks, especially in light of the lucrative revenues that can be made from uranium mining, logging and other destructive practices.CONTACTS: Wilderness Society, www.wilderness.org; National Mining Association, www.nma.org.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

Guatemalan Military Historian Releases New Book: “Los Ingenieros Militares”

first_img Col. Ortega: The protagonists of the different events discussed, such as General Julio César Ruano Herrera, Colonel Mario Enrique Paiz Bolaños, Colonel Ricardo Méndez Ruiz, Engineering Colonel Edgar Leonel Ortega Rivas, Engineering Colonel Julio Alfredo Antillón Guerrero, Lieutenant Colonel Sigfrido Contreras Bonilla, Engineering Colonel Antonio Meléndez, Engineering Colonel Ricardo Figueroa Archila, General Rafael Rossito Contreras, General Mauricio Izquierdo, General José Luis Quilo Ayuso are among many who provided me with important data. Diálogo: Who were some of the people you interviewed for this project? By Dialogo September 11, 2015 Congratulations friend Kaibil Jorge Ortega on your new book and blessings to you, your wife and daughters. I know how good and illustrative your books are. Sincerely Col. (Ret.) Ismael Rodriguez Meraz, Honduras.Regards. Dear Jorge: Thank you for mentioning me as a collaborator in writing your book. Your description is very interesting, since I can attest to the work and the research it took over several years. Even though you were removed from different positions, you kept up your drive to get to the end with drive and achieve success. Col. Ortega: Five. “Los Paracaidistas” (Paratroopers), in 1997, which is being revised now for a new edition. “Los Kaibiles” (The Kaibiles), in 2003, which has had seven reprints. “Los Marinos” (Seamen), in 2006. “Pilotos Aviadores” (Aviators), in 2011, and “Nuestras Guerras” [Our Wars], printed in 2014. Col. Ortega: There is no conflict between the humanities and the Military. What is necessary is to dedicate time in your off-hours to writing and researching, which require a personal commitment and a lot of discipline to complete research projects on Military history. Make time and be productive. After that was “Los Kaibiles,” in 2003, which is in its seventh reprint with more than 10,000 copies. This has allowed me to bring to life other research projects and publications. It is doing phenomenally in the domestic and foreign markets. Col. Ortega: It is a long story, but at the beginning, it was a research project to join the Guatemalan Academy of Geography and History. But at the time, political-military events were not favorable towards the project. I left Guatemala to become a defense attaché in Mexico, and that made it more difficult to find information. The project stayed on the back burner for several years, while I completed and published “Los Pilotos Aviadores” (Aviators), “Nuestras Guerras” (Our Wars), and a book of ironic short stories. Col. Ortega: Yes, the challenges of a short story fascinate me. Saying everything in just a few words, recreating settings, feelings, and actions. I published two books of this sort. The first was “Vida y Milagros de Margarita Angulo” (The Life and Miracles of Margarita Angulo), in 2003, and the second, “La Reina de los Calzones Rotos” (The Queen of Ripped Underpants), in 2013. Both were published by Editorial Palo in Hormigo, Guatemala. Diálogo: How did you balance time for your military duties with time for writing? Upon leaving the Army, I joined the university faculty full time – where I have been for 15 years – and I dedicated a bit of time every day to finish the Military Engineers project, which I presented at that FILGUA 2015 International Book Fair this year. The book’s reception and the critics’ reviews have been very good so far. Diálogo: How many military books did you write before “Los Ingenieros Militares”? Col. Ortega: Because it is a Military history book, academic rigor permeates the work throughout. But I managed to interweave stories and anecdotes from the protagonists from these different times. Can you imagine? From the Late Classical Period of the Mayas to December 2014, in 400 pages. That is an unprecedented odyssey, with many voices that allow us to recover the past and approximate the truth about these events. Retired Guatemalan Infantry Colonel Jorge Ortega, who served his country for 33 years as an Army officer, has published six books about his country’s military history, most recently, “Los Ingenieros Militares” (The Military Engineers), which was released at the at Guatemala’s International Book Fair – FILGUA – 2015. Col. Ortega: An apprentice writer [like me] always has some ink in his well… I have been working on a document since 2002 about the experiences we lived through during the Domestic Armed Conflict in Guatemala. It is a treatment of a complicated time in our nation’s history. It is slow work collecting the information, evidence, testimony from survivors, the life experiences of widows and orphans, anecdotes, publications, press clippings, news videos, mementos, and official documents from that period. Always within the Military sphere, but with application to any human environment. It is in the final review phase. “La Anatomía del Liderazgo” [The Anatomy of Leadership], a work about a Soldier’s (Col. Ortega’s) lessons learned in guiding our men and women in uniform, successes and failures in critical combat situations and in peacetime; life-or-death situations. Diálogo: How many copies were printed in this edition? Another line I’m working on is a book of short stories titled “Alma, ¿cuándo eres mía?” (Soul, when will you be mine?), always in the genre of ironic short stories. In the following interview with Diálogo, Col. Ortega discusses his latest book and how he wrote his other five books focusing on the Armed Forces, which are considered important reference materials on Guatemala’s Military history. Col. Ortega: First, it was a personal commitment to give something back to my Army, which gave me the best job in the world: serving my country. Second, the lack of work on Guatemala’s Military history was a void to be filled. Now, there is a reference work and support for those leading Troops in Guatemala and abroad. It discusses the last two conflicts with our neighbors: the 1903 War of Totoposte and the 1906 National Campaign, in which the Guatemalan forces were victorious, winning a sound and lasting peace with our neighbors that continues to this day. This book was sold out within five weeks of its launch, and a reprint is now being made. Col. Ortega: It was a real challenge to locate the sources of information, but I managed to find them through patience and perseverance. Sometimes, you come up against a dead end or doors that are closed tight to you. But for anyone researching the past, greater difficulty leads to greater creativity! It is a continual challenge: You need contacts and a search plan with options and alternatives, and you need to be very flexible. But the most important thing is to never lose sight of your research goals. Diálogo: What inspired you to write these books about the Military? Col. Ortega: Each book has its charm, some because of the research process, others because of the people you meet while writing it, or the parallel events that facilitate or become obstacles to the composition. Let me give you some examples. The first is “Los Paracaidistas” (Paratroopers), in 1997, which hibernated for more than a decade after it was drafted before it was published. Colonel Jorge Ortega: It is part of a series of publications on the special units of the Guatemalan Army that I decided to compose years ago as my contribution to the Military. But apart from that, Engineering Col. Luis Felipe Ramos González, who at the time was the commanding officer of the Corps of Engineers, asked me to draft historical research on the Engineering Branch and the Army Corps of Engineers, saying that I had his full support in locating sources of information. This project lasted about 10 years. Col. Ortega: 1,500 copies. Diálogo: Given that there was no tradition of books on Military history in Guatemala, what did you base your works on? The book “Nuestras Guerras,” 2014, is dedicated to recovering from obscurity those Guatemalan men and women who went to war a century ago and were deployed to the borders of our country to defend sovereignty, territorial integrity, and peace for our nation. Diálogo: The book has a lot of research, but you managed to enlighten the narrative with a lot of human-interest stories… After that came “Los Marinos” in 2005. Putting this project together took me through an incredible maze to learn the history of the Naval Forces. After it was published, it garnered praise from Swedish and Guatemalan Seamen, the founders of the Guatemalan Navy, and a commemorative postage stamp. It is the history of Guatemala as seen from the sea. Diálogo: How has your life been since you retired from the Military three years ago? It was a real ordeal to get “Los Ingenieros Militares” written and published, but it was released this year after more than a decade of work. The manuscript left Guatemala and returned, after a long journey at the end of my Military career. It was a fellow traveler and companion during the autumn years of my Military career. And it is going along very well right now. Diálogo: Have you written books that are not about the Army? Diálogo: What do you think your best book is? Diálogo: Are you planning to write more books? Diálogo: How did this research project become a book? “Los Pilotos Aviadores,” in 2011, is a fabulous book. It is a collection of 100 years of feats by Guatemalan men and women conquering our air space. This publication allowed us to recognize publicly the pioneers of aviation, including the first female Aviator Pilot of Guatemala, who was decorated with the Guatemalan Air Forces Cross. We also achieved a postage stamp commemorating a Century of Air Locomotion, under the Directorate General of Mail and Telegrams. Diálogo: How did the idea for a book The Military Engineers originate? Col. Ortega: Spectacular! With its bright and dark spots, with joy, personal satisfaction, and my family, with sadness at the passing of friends and relatives, with work and with projects for the midterm. There’s always a bit of nostalgia for the Army days, but those are chapters in life that we must complete, and now I am left with the satisfaction of having fulfilled my duty to the nation through my Military career. One is a Soldier forever! We love our country unto death.last_img read more

Funding job training with a twist

first_imgAs the only Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) on the 120-mile stretch of Lake Erie shoreline from Toledo to Cleveland, Commodore Perry Federal Credit Union($45.3M, Oak Harbor, OH) feels a particular tug toward addressing the economic barriers faced by its rural and small-town membership.That’s one inspiration behind the unique offering the cooperative just rolled out: a mix-and-match package of four loans aimed at enabling Ottawa County residents to pay for the training and certifications they need to get good-paying jobs.The package comprises a debt consolidation loan, an auto refinancing loan, a technical skills education loan, and perhaps the most unique offering, a wage replacement loan. That loan will be disbursed as a paycheck and the payments deferred while the borrower is enrolled in a training program. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more