Land rights cause people to act in crazy ways

first_imgFacebook by Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected]“THE most sensible and decent people behave in crazy ways when it comes to land”, according to a Limerick barrister.Defence counsel Mark Nicholas BL, made his comments during the sentencing hearing of a Limerick man accused of threatening to kill a business owner in a dispute over a right of way to his home.Brian Healy (48) of Sexton Street North pleaded guilty to threatening to kill Patrick Moloney at the Woodworkers store in Thomondgate on May 19, 2012.Limerick Circuit Court heard evidence from Detective Garda Keith Harmon, who said there had been difficulties in the past between the two men over a “common area or passageway” between Mr Healy’s home and the Woodworkers store owned by Mr Moloney.On May 19, 2012, Mr Healy was walking to his mother’s house where he lived when Mr Moloney came out from his shop. A n argument ensued and Mr Healy said he had a gun and would use it to shoot Mr Moloney.He also threatened to “burn out” the business and slit Mr Moloney’s throat.Mr Moloney’s father was waiting for his son in a car nearby and made a statement to Gardaí of overhearing the exchange.Prosecuting counsel John O’Sullivan said it caused great distress to Mr. Moloney.Mr Healy attempted to goad Mr Moloney into hitting him. There was no physical altercation between the two men and no further incidents since.Detective Harmon said Mr Healy admitted he threatened to “knock him out” but denied saying he would use a gun.Gardaí did not search Mr Healy’s home for a gun.Mark Nicholas BL said that his client, who had no previous convictions, regretted what happened and he had no intention of harming Mr Moloney.“The most sensible and decent people behave in crazy ways when it comes to land,” he said, adding that the house, which was owned by his client’s mother until she died, was to be sold.Applying the probation act, Judge Carroll Moran said that Brian Healy said some “very unpleasant things but he had a previous good record and there was no issue between the two parties since.“If he does it again or anything similar, he will likely go to jail”, the judge warned. Twitter WhatsApp Advertisement NewsCommunityLand rights cause people to act in crazy waysBy Staff Reporter – February 6, 2014 1178 #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Linkedin Print Rape Crisis welcomes publication of O’Malley reportcenter_img Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Email TAGSassaultCourtland rightsMusic Limerickthreatswoodworkers store Previous articleJFK and Brian BorúNext articleBurglar jailed after found hiding in wardrobe Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday last_img read more

A Major Factor Behind Mortgage Delinquencies

first_img A Major Factor Behind Mortgage Delinquencies The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, Market Studies, News CoreLogic Delinquency Employment Foreclosure Jobs 2019-11-19 Seth Welborn Home / Daily Dose / A Major Factor Behind Mortgage Delinquencies The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: CoreLogic Delinquency Employment Foreclosure Jobs The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Postcenter_img In the states with the biggest gains in delinquency, job loss was a contributing factor, according to the latest Loan Performance Insights Reports from CoreLogic. While the nation’s overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999, five states posted small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in August: Iowa (0.2 percentage points), Minnesota (0.1 percentage points), Nebraska (0.1 percentage points), Wisconsin (0.1 percentage points) and Rhode Island (0.1 percentage points).“Job loss can trigger a loan delinquency, especially for families with limited savings,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft Chief Economist for CoreLogic. “The rise in overall delinquency in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and Wisconsin coincided with a rise in state unemployment rates between August 2018 and August 2019.”Additionally, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana, New Hampshire, and Utah all saw increases in serious delinquency rates, or loans 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure.On a smaller scale, 47 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in August. Some of the highest gains were in the Midwest and Southeast. Metros with the largest increases were Dubuque, Iowa (2.2 percentage points), Pine Bluff, Arkansas (1.1 percentage points), Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.6 percentage points) and Panama City, Florida (0.5 percentage points).Additionally, 19 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in their serious delinquency rates. Metros with the largest increases were Panama City, Florida (0.9 percentage points), Jacksonville, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points), Wilmington, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points) and Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points). The remaining 15 metro areas logged annual increases of 0.1 percentage point.“Delinquency rates are at 14-year lows, reflecting a decade of tight underwriting standards, the benefits of prolonged low interest rates and the improved balance sheets of many households across the country,” said Frank Martell President and CEO of CoreLogic. “Despite this month’s near record-low serious delinquency rate, several metros in hurricane-ravaged areas of the Southeast have experienced higher delinquency rates of late.  We expect to see these metros to return to pre-disaster delinquency rates over the next several months.” Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago November 19, 2019 1,975 Views About Author: Seth Welborn Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Mortgage Servicing: A “People Business” Next: Rising Rates for Minority Homeownership Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

44 test positive on Norwegian cruise ship

first_imgIn the Arctic harbor of Bodoe, neither crew nor passengers were allowed to get off the cruise ship Seadream 1 after a person from Denmark tested positive on Tuesday upon returning home. The vessel arrived early Wednesday, and tests will be carried out on the pier, the Norwegian news agency NTB said. (AP) Following the outbreak on the MS Roald Amundsen, the ship’s owner halted all cruises on Monday and Norway closed its ports to cruise ships for two weeks. COPENHAGEN, Denmark – The number of people on a Norwegian cruise ship who have tested positive for the coronavirus has reached 44, authorities said. The cruise line often acts like a local ferry, traveling from port to port along Norway’s west coast. Some passengers disembarked along the route and authorities fear they may have spread the virus to local communities.center_img The Norwegian Institute of Public Health said late Tuesday that 35 crew members and nine passengers had tested positive. All passengers were registered as living in Norway. They were not identified. Forty four crew members and guests who sailed aboard the MS Roald Amundsen have so far tested positive for COVID-19. GETTY IMAGESlast_img read more