Protecting call centers from spoofed calls

first_imgCall centers are becoming increasingly more vulnerable to fraud. With the proliferation of stolen identity information available on the Dark Web and the ability to social engineer other validation information, fraudsters are increasing committing account takeover via IVR and direct contact with call center personnel.According to IDology’s 2015 Fraud Report, suspected call center fraud attempts rose from only 2% in 2014 to 13% in 2015. Additionally, fraudsters have access to technology that allows them to mask, or spoof, phone numbers enabling them to avoid caller ID or automated number identification (ANI) systems used in credit unions’ call centers today.Criminals always try to exploit the weakest link to attempt to gain access to accounts, reset passwords and more. Call centers can often provide this avenue to fraudsters allowing them to spoof a number and then social engineer their way into someone’s account.Having the proper tools to combat spoofing is essential to stopping call center fraud. Advanced call verification solutions go beyond number matching and verify if the displayed number is actually, in connection with call center.  This gives agents and fraud teams to identify spoofed numbers in real-time and reduce the chance of social engineering attacks – ultimately improving call center efficiency and security.Spoofed calls are also on the radar for fraud professionals. In 2015, Mercator Advisory Group interviewed fraud management executives at financial services institutions. In an executive brief sponsored by IDology, respondents noted that “Fraudsters are innovative, finding new tactics for gaining information to disguise their identities for financial gain by using event changes or new forms of spoofing, hacking or account takeover.”Additionally, IDology’s annual Fraud Report also found that suspected fraud attempts continue to climb – making it essential for credit unions to not only have the ability to spot potential spoofed calls for financial gain and account takeovers, but to also employ a fraud prevention platform that encompasses the many ways criminals try to gain access to credit unions members’ accounts.To download the complete IDology’s 2015 Fraud Report or the recently published executive brief focusing on the financial services industry, click here. 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Dancu John Dancu has served as President and CEO of IDology since 2005 and is recognized for his leading edge innovations in both the identity and fraud spaces. John has a … Web: https://www.idology.com Detailslast_img read more

‘A disaster’: Roche CEO’s verdict on some COVID-19 antibody tests

first_imgSome blood tests being marketed to tell people if they have had the new coronavirus are a “disaster”, Roche Chief Executive Severin Schwan said on Wednesday as he prepares to launch the drugmaker’s own antibody test next month.Roche’s diagnostics business has moved out of the shadow of its main medicines unit during the pandemic, as the Swiss pharma giant confirmed its 2020 sales and profit outlook amid rising demand for COVID-19 testing.Countries around the world hope such blood tests – meant to show whether people exposed to the disease have developed antibodies thought to offer some immunity – will guide efforts to restart their economies and keep healthcare workers safe. Sales of those tests helped push first-quarter sales in its Molecular Diagnostics business up 29% in the first three months of the year, it said.Amateurs in garages By contrast, Roche’s planned antibody test relies on intravenous blood draws taken by a nurse or a doctor.Schwan did not release figures for its test’s “specificity”, or how many false-positives can be expected, but promised it would be reliable because Roche had successfully found the antibody produced by the body after exposure to the novel virus.”This is really what matters,” he said. “Every kind of amateur could produce an antibody test. The two of us could do it overnight in the garage. That’s not the problem.””The question is, does it really work? And for that, you have to do testing and validation,” he added.Abbott Laboratories also said last week it would begin shipping a new coronavirus blood test similar to Roche’s by June. Like Roche’s test, Abbott’s assay would be launched under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s recently relaxed rules for coronavirus tests.Roche confirmed its existing 2020 forecast for sales to grow in the low-to-mid single-digit percentage range, with core earnings growth per share matching that, after first-quarter sales rose 7% to 15.1 billion Swiss francs ($15.57 billion).While most of Roche’s coronavirus activity has been focused on testing, it is also studying if its older arthritis drug Actemra will help critically ill patients hit by severe immune system reactions, also called cytokine storms. The medicine has already been deployed for such cases on a limited basis, including in China. An erroneous false-positive result could lead to the mistaken conclusion that someone has immunity. In developing its test, Schwan said, Roche scrutinized some existing products for reliability before rejecting them.”It’s a disaster. These tests are not worth anything, or have very little use,” Schwan told reporters on a conference call. “Some of these companies, I tell you, this is ethically very questionable to get out with this stuff.”Schwan said there were about 100 such tests on offer, including finger-prick assays that offer a quick result. The Basel-based company declined to specify which rival tests it had studied, but said it was not referring to tests from established testing companies.Roche also makes separate tests to determine if a person has an active coronavirus infection, with a sample taken via a swab from nasal passages.center_img Topics :last_img read more