Dogara Congratulates Heavyweight Champion Anthony Joshua

first_imgOlawale Ajimotokan Speaker of the House of Representatives, Hon. Yakubu Dogara, has congratulated British-Nigerian boxer, Anthony Oluwafemi Olaseni Joshua, on clinching the unified world heavyweight title.This was made known via a statement released by his Special Adviser on media and publicity, Turaki Hassan, in Abuja on Monday.“I would like to congratulate the world heavyweight champion, Anthony Olaseni Joshua, for this great feat that he has achieved. His dedication, discipline and commitment to boxing has paid off, as his is now a household name.” “The young man’s affinity for Nigeria is also apparent and commendable, as he has acknowledged his Nigerian roots in interviews and fully embraced the Nigerian identity.”The Speaker then called on sports development authorities in the country to seize this challenge as impetus to identify and develop home grown talent so that Nigerian athletes may compete on a global scale.“Anthony Joshua’s success should be taken as an indication of what’s possible if we devote the required resources to training our athletes and offering all the support that they need. Many athletes of Nigerian origin represent and win medals for other countries because the environment which we offer is not very conducive, and now is the time to change that.”“Tales of our athletes being owed what’s due to them and the gruelling circumstances in which they have to prepare for tournaments discourage many from engaging in sports, and in cases where they do, we lose such talents to other countries, which are serious about capacity development.“This calls for deep introspection on our part, as there are career opportunities for our teeming youth population outside academic institutions and white collar jobs that corporate entities have to offer.“Young Nigerians have excelled in entertainment, for instance, and gone on to build enviable careers in the creative industry. This, they have managed to achieve without deliberate effort on the part of government and one can only imagine the heights which our youths would attain if we took deliberate steps towards genuinely supporting them in their chosen fields.”“I would like to, once more, congratulate Mr. Joshua, while calling on the Executive (arm of government), through the relevant agencies, to implement policies which would help greatly with developing home grown talent,” concludes the Speaker.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Softball: Badgers sweep double-header with two mercies

first_imgWisconsin softball hosted the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Phoenix for a double-header during a chilly afternoon Tuesday, but the weather did not seem to affect the Badgers.Wisconsin’s (26-19-1) bats came alive as the team dominated both games 8-0, thanks to a strong performance at the mound from pitcher Taylor-Paige Stewart and situational hitting.The Badgers were held in check for the majority of the first game, only leading 2-0 going into the bottom half of the fifth inning. But the team would go on to score six in the final two innings, invoking the mercy rule for an early end to the game.Wisconsin expanded on their two-run lead thanks to an RBI single by Ashley Van Zeeland in the fifth and a sacrifice fly by Melanie Cross increased their lead to 4-0.Sara Novak sunk the dagger in the sixth when an RBI single and an error allowed another score, putting the Badgers up by six. Wisconsin would add two more in the frame to get the final score of 8-0.Stewart, who received the win in both contests and improved to 15-10 on the year, was on cruise control for both games. The senior allowed only one hit in each game while striking out nine in the first of the twin bill, tying her season high. Stewart added another five punch-outs in game two and again allowed only one unearned run in her three innings pitched.With an ample amount of run support in both games, Stewart said games like these ease the pressure when pitching.“The atmosphere of our dugout changes and the stress on the mound definitely decreases when you know your offense is lighting it up,” Stewart said.The Badgers picked up right where they left off in game two by getting to Phoenix pitcher Katie Rossman early in the bottom of the first. Both Kelsey Jenkins and Van Zeeland reached base, and were followed by Chloe Miller’s three-run blast to right — all before Green Bay recorded an out.“[Hitting a home run] always feels good,” Miller said. “It happens in practice, but until you get it in the game, there’s nothing like seeing your team when you cross home plate.”Wisconsin continued to pile on hits and runs in the following two innings.In the second, Jenkins ripped an RBI-double down the left field line and followed with a third inning that saw Katie Christner hit a line-drive home run down the left field line, which got out in a hurry to give the Badgers a 5-0 lead. Wisconsin chased Rossman in the same inning while tacking on three more runs and would hold their eight-run lead to the end of the fifth to again force the mercy rule.Coming into the day’s double-header, Wisconsin owned a 4-6-1 record at home, but head coach Yvette Healy said wins like these are what her team needed as they try to qualify for the Big Ten Tournament in two weeks.“Just to play well on our field is a big deal,” Healy said. “This weekend is another huge weekend and I think these mid-week games give us a little momentum going into it.”The Badgers will welcome the Northwestern Wildcats this weekend for a three-game set and the team’s final home series of the season. First pitch is slated for 3 p.m Friday.last_img read more

When God Gave Israelites the Torah

first_imgWOODLAND HILLS – Revelations and eyebrow-raising stories from the Torah will be featured Tuesday during a Shavuot study session at Temple Aliyah. The five-hour session – dubbed “Bible Stories My Rabbi Never Taught Me (and My Mother Doesn’t Want Me to Know)” – will feature six rabbis presented by Temple Aliyah, Congregation Shir Ami and Temple Kol Tikvah. Shavuot, which is Hebrew for “weeks,” is the Jewish celebration of God’s giving of the Torah – including the Ten Commandments – at Mount Sinai. Verses in Exodus 19 tell of thunder, lightning, resounding horn blasts, a cloud of smoke and the trembling of the Israelites as God spoke. But the two-day festival marking the event is most associated with eating dairy delicacies including kugels, blintzes and cheesecake; it doesn’t command the same high-profile fanfare of Passover or the High Holy Days. “Shavuot is the most overlooked Jewish holiday. And it’s huge!” exclaimed Rabbi Stewart Vogel from Temple Aliyah. “In truth, it should be the most compelling Jewish holiday. “God, Torah and the Jewish people – that’s the essence of Judaism, and on Shavuot those three come together.” Unlike Passover’s ritual-laden Seder, Vogel said, Shavuot doesn’t have a significant home ritual. “It’s also not like the synagogue holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur that speak to the individual about change and self-reflection,” said Vogel. “Shavuot is the Jewish communal experience – a powerful moment as a people. “Shavuot is the process by which we relive and experience that moment of receiving Torah, and it should be a fresh and compelling relationship.” But Shavuot does have a tradition underlain with mysticism. Tikkun Leyl Shavuot – “repairing the night” – is a communal study that in some congregations is held literally all night until dawn. The concept is designed to re-create the excitement and edginess Israelites might have felt as they stayed up all night in anticipation of hearing God. At Tuesday’s event, Rabbi Jennifer Flam from Temple Aliyah will discuss “Song of Songs: Holy or Blasphemous?” While the “Song of Songs” is controversial, Flam said it appears to be a love poem. “We will uncover the holiness and look at the nuances. We will understand that it is a love story between God and Israel,” she said. The one-hour session will present Rabbinic thought and contemporary understandings of the poem, as well as a look at modern Israeli poems. “We study all night (on Shavuot) to merit to receive the Torah,” Flam said. “I would like (the study session participants) to increase their relationship to the tradition and feel that they are part of a larger community. I’m hoping that they will feel a real closeness to Torah and be engaged by its teachings in a new way.” On Shavuot, observant Jews will refrain from work and Jewish day schools are closed. It also is customary on the first day to read the Ten Commandments during morning services, as well as the Book of Ruth. Vogel said Shavuot is a reminder that learning should be a lifelong pursuit. “Torah literally means teaching. The important role of study, learning and applying those in our life becomes the message of Shavuot. For me, I like that,” he said. “We’re showing that we’re not afraid of these stories (at the study session). “People don’t really know these stories. We’re going to tackle the most controversial to help to understand them. If the Torah is the most sacred work, why did God put these stories in? We’re going to find out what should Torah mean in our lives.” Tikkun Leyl Shavuot, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday to 12:15 a.m. Wednesday, Temple Aliyah, 6025 Valley Circle Blvd., Woodland Hills. Minyan, 7:30-7:45 p.m. Reservations requested. Call (818) 346-3545. “What Did She Really Uncover? A Closer Look at Ruth and Boaz on the Threshing Room Floor,” led by Rabbi Janet Offel and “David, King of Israel?” led by Rabbi Adam Schaffer, from 7:50-8:50 p.m.; “What’s Up With Lot? The Troubled Stories of a Father and His Daughters,” led by Rabbi Stewart Vogel and “What’s Really Behind the Veil? Exploring the Tale of Tamar and Yehudah,” led by Rabbinic Intern Gary Oren, from 8:55-9:55 p.m.; “Song of Songs: Holy or Blasphemous?” led by Rabbi Jennifer Flam and “The Rebellious Son: What to Do When We Feel Like Killing Our Children,” led by Rabbi David Vorspan, from 10-11 p.m. “Censoring the Torah and Haftarah: What Were the Rabbis Thinking?” led by scholar Joel Gereboff, from 11:15 p.m.-12:15 a.m. holly.andres@dailynews.com (818) 713-3708160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Alaska News Nightly Tuesday Apr 5 2016

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprnDownload AudioFour Supreme Court nominees submitted to Gov. WalkerZachariah Hughes, KSKA – AnchorageFour nominees to replace an outgoing state Supreme Court justice have been submitted to Governor Bill Walker for review. Walker now has about six weeks to name a replacement to the bench.Rep. Olson bill would tax Permanent Fund dividends as budget stopgapAndrew Kithenman, KTOO – JuneauRepresentative Kurt Olson, a Soldotna Republican developed a plan to tax Permanent Fund dividends back in February. But he didn’t introduce it at the time, because he wanted to see how the debate over plans from Governor Bill Walker and others unfolded. But with less than two weeks left in the session, Olson – decided it was time for House Bill 376. It would apply a 35-percent tax to dividends.Alaskans are testifying more than ever… but does it matter?Hannah Colton, KDLG – DillinghamSince January, thousands of Alaskans have called in to speak before the Alaska Legislature. Their testimony is facilitated by 23 Legislative Information Offices around the state, then channeled into the legislative process.Rep. Young calls on Juneau Republicans to support Sturgeon caseAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauCongressman Don Young yesterday called on Juneau Republicans to support legislative funding for John Sturgeon’s legal fight over operating a hovercraft in a national preserve.No trucks advised on upriver ice roadAnna Rose MacArthur, KYUK – BethelUpriver travel on the Kuskokwim has just gotten harder. Ice crews haveremoved road markers between Tuluksak and Kalskag and are advising no more truck traffic between these points. That means people upriver will be staying in place or shelling out money for airfare until breakup.Denali area wolf hunt shortenedDan Bross, KUAC – FairbanksThe Alaska Board of Game has approved a National Park Service proposal aimed at reducing the number of park wolves killed outside Denali’s northern boundary. It’s thelatest move in a long running debate over how to manage park wolves that roam onto state land.Bonds, Assembly seats and School board among Anchorage Municipality ballotsLori Townsend, APRN – AnchorageSelf-contained two-way about tonight’s Anchorage election. You can follow on the live blog, too!Bill introduced to allow communities to contribute to Marine HighwayEd Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska – JuneauA Southeast lawmaker wants communities to be able to contribute directly to the Alaska Marine Highway System.Sitka commemorates relationship with Japanese sister cityEmily Kwong, KCAW – SitkaSitka has a sister city in Nemuro, Japan. Like Sitka, Nemuro is an ocean-facing fishing port, but larger – about 30,000 people to Sitka’s 10,000. And on Monday Nemuro citizens visited Sitka’s city hall to commemorate their decades long relationship.last_img read more