YouTube videos featuring children rank in highest views Pew study says

first_img YouTube Videos featuring children were the most popular during the first week of 2019, a Pew research study finds.  Getty YouTube’s ties to videos with children just got even more awkward. In the first week of 2019, videos featuring children under the age of 13 brought in three times as many views as any other content, according to a new study by Pew Research Center released Thursday. The details come a week after YouTube parent company Google reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the US Federal Trade Commission over alleged violations of child data privacy laws on YouTube. The settlement followed an FTC investigation into whether Google was protecting children’s data. YouTube doesn’t intend for its main platform to be used by those under 13 and directs a younger audience to use YouTube Kids.Pew analyzed videos published in the first week of January by 43,770 channels, all of which featured more than 250,000 subscribers. Collectively, the channels in the Pew study posted nearly a quarter-million videos and spanned 48,486 hours.”A single person watching videos for eight hours a day (with no breaks or days off) would need more than 16 years to watch all the content posted by just the most popular channels on the platform during a single week,” the study added. In other findings, 18% of English-language videos analyzed in the study were related to gaming. These videos were often longer in length than other content. Also, videos with keywords such as “Fortnite,” “prank” or “worst” received five times as many views as videos not mentioning those words. Earlier this year, Wired reported on how pedophiles were using the comment section of YouTube videos with children to lure in other predators. Neither Pew Research Center nor YouTube immediately respond to a request for comment.  Share your voice Mobile Internet Applications Computers Mobile Apps Internet Services TV and Movies YouTube accused of violating child privacy laws Now playing: Watch this:center_img Comment Tags 1 2:22last_img read more

Best of Last Week – New way to detect dark matter a

first_img © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Scientific Reports Trio create artificial magnetic wormhole (Phys.org)—It was another good week for physics as Ian Shoemaker, until recently with the University of Southern Denmark, proposed a new theory, suggesting that if we want to detect dark matter, we might need a different approach—he believes that scientists should be looking for dark radiation signals that theoretically result from dark matter collisions. Also, another trio created an artificial magnetic wormhole—a three-layered sphere that makes it appears as if a magnetic field has suddenly disappeared and then reappeared somewhere else. In other news, a team of researchers in Rome and Geneva found a way to create tiny gears that increase light-to-work conversion efficiency by five orders of magnitude—by shining an LED light on tiny pinwheel-shaped gears floating on a liquid surface. Also, an international team of researchers came up with a way to fabricate hexagonal silicon, potentially leading to light-emitting semiconductors. They believe it could lead to new kinds of optical, electrical and superconducting materials. And another team at Cornell University reported on their efforts to explore the origins of energy in chemical reactions using experimental quantum chemistry.In unrelated news, a team of paleobotanists reported that they had identified what could be the mythical “first flower”—Montsechia vidalii, a plant that once grew abundantly in the Pyrenees and in the Iberian Range. Also, another team working at the Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten dig site in Germany reported that they had found evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe. In the interesting developments file, a team of researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reported that they had developed a drug—a regenerative peptide—that protects against the deadly effects of nuclear radiation 24 hours after exposure. And there were reports, of course, of the Ashley Madison “cheater” files hitting the dark web—the hacker group made good on its promise to release data stolen from the site that specializes in providing a way for people to cheat on their partners.And finally, if you have ever found things getting weird when gazing into the eyes of a loved one for very long, you might have a lot of company, as a team of researchers has found that staring into someone’s eyes for a long time can cause hallucinations. Apparently, it happens to most people. Citation: Best of Last Week – New way to detect dark matter, a magnetic wormhole and staring found to cause hallucinations (2015, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-week-dark-magnetic-wormhole-hallucinations.html Explore further (a) The field of a magnetic source (right) is appearing as an isolated magnetic monopole when passing through the magnetostatic wormhole; the whole spherical device is magnetically undetectable. (b) The wormhole is composed of (from left to right) an outer spherical ferromagnetic metasurface, a spherical superconducting layer, and an inner spirally wound ferromagnetic sheet. Credit: Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 12488 (2015) doi:10.1038/srep12488 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Physics pair show that Ising model can be used as a universal

first_img Journal information: Science (Phys.org)—A pair of physicists has shown that it is possible to transform disparate spin models into different types of just one simple model. In their paper published in the journal Science, Gemma De las Cuevas, with the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics and Toby Cubitt, with University College London, offer a proof to show that any spin model can be converted to the relatively simple Ising model. Stephanie Wehner with QuTech, Delft University of Technology offers a Perspectives piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue, outlining the proof and explaining how and why a universal spin model would be useful. © 2016 Phys.org The benefit of having a universal model, Wehner explains, is that it offers an alternative way for scientists to run their models, particularly on a computer. If a 3D model is extremely complex, for example, or requires an untenable number of cycles to run, there is a chance it could be configured to run as an Ising model. But she notes that it could also be used as a means for melding the work being done by physicists and computer scientists, helping to further explain the workings of nature. Explore further Citation: Physics pair show that Ising model can be used as a universal spin model (2016, March 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-03-physics-pair-ising-universal.html Spin models were first developed as a means to help explain the properties of magnetic materials—the magnetism in each atom originates from the spin of an unpaired electron within it. The first was created by Wilhelm Lenz, who handed it off to Ernest Ising, who used it to show that spins should undergo phase transitions below a certain temperature. Since that time, spin models have been developed for a wide variety of applications, perhaps most notably in particle physics. Now, in this new effort, De las Cuevas and Cutitt show that it is possible to transform any of these other newer models into the 2D Ising model, including 3D models.Their proof has two main parts, the first involved showing that any Ising model is equivalent to an instance of a satisfiability problem and showing a way to match such problems to an Ising model. The second part involved showing how any spin model could be converted to a satisfiability problem and then translated to an Ising model.center_img Scientists explain the theory behind Ising superconductivity More information: G. De las Cuevas et al. Simple universal models capture all classical spin physics, Science (2016). DOI: 10.1126/science.aab3326AbstractSpin models are used in many studies of complex systems because they exhibit rich macroscopic behavior despite their microscopic simplicity. Here, we prove that all the physics of every classical spin model is reproduced in the low-energy sector of certain “universal models,” with at most polynomial overhead. This holds for classical models with discrete or continuous degrees of freedom. We prove necessary and sufficient conditions for a spin model to be universal and show that one of the simplest and most widely studied spin models, the two-dimensional Ising model with fields, is universal. Our results may facilitate physical simulations of Hamiltonians with complex interactions. Universal models contain all models, just like white light contains all colors. Credit: Christian Hackenberger Universal models contain all models, just like white light contains all colors. Credit: Christian Hackenberger This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more