Best of Last Week – New way to detect dark matter a

first_img © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Scientific Reports Trio create artificial magnetic wormhole (Phys.org)—It was another good week for physics as Ian Shoemaker, until recently with the University of Southern Denmark, proposed a new theory, suggesting that if we want to detect dark matter, we might need a different approach—he believes that scientists should be looking for dark radiation signals that theoretically result from dark matter collisions. Also, another trio created an artificial magnetic wormhole—a three-layered sphere that makes it appears as if a magnetic field has suddenly disappeared and then reappeared somewhere else. In other news, a team of researchers in Rome and Geneva found a way to create tiny gears that increase light-to-work conversion efficiency by five orders of magnitude—by shining an LED light on tiny pinwheel-shaped gears floating on a liquid surface. Also, an international team of researchers came up with a way to fabricate hexagonal silicon, potentially leading to light-emitting semiconductors. They believe it could lead to new kinds of optical, electrical and superconducting materials. And another team at Cornell University reported on their efforts to explore the origins of energy in chemical reactions using experimental quantum chemistry.In unrelated news, a team of paleobotanists reported that they had identified what could be the mythical “first flower”—Montsechia vidalii, a plant that once grew abundantly in the Pyrenees and in the Iberian Range. Also, another team working at the Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten dig site in Germany reported that they had found evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe. In the interesting developments file, a team of researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reported that they had developed a drug—a regenerative peptide—that protects against the deadly effects of nuclear radiation 24 hours after exposure. And there were reports, of course, of the Ashley Madison “cheater” files hitting the dark web—the hacker group made good on its promise to release data stolen from the site that specializes in providing a way for people to cheat on their partners.And finally, if you have ever found things getting weird when gazing into the eyes of a loved one for very long, you might have a lot of company, as a team of researchers has found that staring into someone’s eyes for a long time can cause hallucinations. Apparently, it happens to most people. Citation: Best of Last Week – New way to detect dark matter, a magnetic wormhole and staring found to cause hallucinations (2015, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-week-dark-magnetic-wormhole-hallucinations.html Explore further (a) The field of a magnetic source (right) is appearing as an isolated magnetic monopole when passing through the magnetostatic wormhole; the whole spherical device is magnetically undetectable. (b) The wormhole is composed of (from left to right) an outer spherical ferromagnetic metasurface, a spherical superconducting layer, and an inner spirally wound ferromagnetic sheet. Credit: Scientific Reports 5, Article number: 12488 (2015) doi:10.1038/srep12488 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

US Appeals Court In Chicago Again Upholds La

first_imgU.S. Appeals Court In Chicago Again Upholds Laws Banning… by NPR News Bobby Allyn 8.29.19 7:00pm A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld Cook County, Ill., gun laws, including a ban on assault weapons and large-capacity magazines, affirming a lower court decision that found the regulations to be constitutional.The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that two gun owners, who sued over the gun control measures in the county where Chicago is located, “have not come forward with a compelling reason to revisit” since the last time the same court examined a similar challenge — out of the Chicago suburb of Highland Park, which was also sued after passing an assault weapons ban. In that case, the 7th Circuit said that the Second Amendment “does not imperil every law regulating firearms.”In 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to consider the case. That meant the appeals court’s decision that local governments have latitude in regulating firearms stayed in place, and on Thursday, the three-judge panel refused to revisit that decision.The plaintiffs, Troy Edhlund and Matthew Wilson, argued that Cook County’s ban on assault weapons was so vague that it could potentially make it illegal to possess semi-automatic firearms that were not assault weapons. The duo said the gun regulations impinged on their right to bear arms. In contending that the Cook County case was distinct from the Highland Park challenge, lawyers for the two gun owners wrote that the “frequency of the criminal threats faced” in the Chicago area should be considered in deciding whether restrictions infringe on a gun owner’s Second Amendment rights. The court, however, did not find that logic persuasive, saying the gun laws did not prevent citizens from acquiring other types of weapons for self-protection. “Our discussion of self-defense focused instead on the availability of other means for citizens to defend themselves,” the court wrote. “This is a question answered by the particular locality’s laws, not by its crime rates.”Gregory Bedell, a lawyer for Edhlund and Wilson, did not return a request for comment by NPR. The case can be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court, which has become more conservative since the justices rejected the Highland Park case in 2015.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. M. Spencer Greenlast_img read more

Daniel Reszka has joined Canal Plus Cyfrowy as an

first_imgDaniel Reszka has joined Canal Plus Cyfrowy as an advisor to the Polish pay TV operator’s content and programming strategy board.Reszka will be responsible for strengthening and optimising the range of channels on the platform. He will report to Beata Monka, chairman of the board at Canal Plus Cyfrowy.Reszka moves from Viacom International Media Networks Northern Europe, where he served as vice-president of programming.last_img

Orange has teamed up with French public broadcaste

first_imgOrange has teamed up with French public broadcaster France Télévisions to air the first live broadcast of matches in 8K over 5G from the Roland Garros French Open tennis tournament.The pair have joined forces to air what the say will be the first ever live 8K TV images of matches from the Philippe-Chatrier court, broadcast thanks to Orange’s 5G network within the Roland-Garros stadium.During the 15-day competition, visitors will be able to view coverage of matches at the stadium in two specially created showrooms.France Télévisions’ 8K cameraswill broadcast live to Orange’s local 5G transmitters deployed specifically for the competition.France Télévisions’ sports newsroom will also test Orange’s new 5G broadcasting capability to film their coverage of the tournament in HD using mobile camerasVery high-resolution coverage will be aired on 5G smartphones by Oppo, while the 8K images will be aired on a panaormanci display wall.Orange and the French Tennis Federation are also using the tornament to develop mixed reality experiences. Viewers equipped with Magic Leap One headsets will be able to view animated projected images, synchronised with live coverage of matches.Visitors will be able to interact with the projected images and move around to choose the best viewpoint.Finally, Orange is tapping artificial intelligence capabilities to provide a virtual assistant to answer Roland Garros visitors’ questions about the event on smartphones.The virtual assistant will provide information about the history of the tournament, practical information for visitors and information about match results and the day’s schedule.last_img read more