London Stock Exchange consults on trading hours change

first_imgAnd new regulatory reporting times would require regulatory approval. The paper said a co-ordinated approach by European exchanges is needed for the changes to be effective.The proposal follows a recent call from the Association for Financial Markets in Europe (AFME) and the Investment Association (IA), to shorten and harmonise operating hours for European stock exchanges, to between 9am and 4pm GMT.“Our members tell us that a reduction of 90 minutes in European markets would bring significant benefits to the market structure, concentrating liquidity and allowing adequate time to absorb corporate announcements,” the AFME and IA said.They also said shorter hours would improve the mental wellbeing of staff and encourage staff diversity, allowing firms to attract a wider variety of talent.“Anecdotal evidence from members is that trading remains one of the areas of financial services where staff face significant mental health issues,” they observed. “We consider that the excessively long hours play a major contributory part in generating and perpetuating this problem.”Responding to the LSE paper, Galina Dimitrova, director for investment and capital markets at the IA, said: “We are very pleased the London Stock Exchange has listened to traders’ calls.”She added: “We need to call time on the long hours culture, which is detrimental to diversity and mental health, and inefficient for the markets. A shortened day will benefit the markets, those that operate them and ultimately the clients we serve.”Meanwhile, the LSE consultation also aims to strengthen trading in small cap securities, which has seen a reduction in numbers of specialist brokers and advisers. The LSE suggests reducing the number of daily auctions for the Stock Exchange Electronic Trading Service SETSqx platform – on which smaller caps are traded – from five to three.“Almost 57.7% of trading activity on the service occurs during the closing auction,” said the paper. “By reducing the number of auctions, liquidity may become concentrated in the remaining auctions, providing more meaningful price discovery and trading sizes.”The paper also canvasses ideas for improving liquidity during the LSE’s mid-day intraday auction, introduced in 2016 to offer the opportunity to trade block orders at a traditionally low volatility point in the day. Between inception and end-September 2019, these auctions have attracted only 0.1% of value traded on SETS.The consultation closes on 31 January 2020. The London Stock Exchange (LSE) has launched a consultation on potential changes to the market’s structure, including changes to trading hours, as well as plans to improve the liquidity of smaller cap securities, and of intraday auction activity.Five alternative sets of opening hours are suggested for the London exchange, including retaining the existing 8am to 4.30pm arrangement.One major benefit of a change would be to concentrate liquidity within the new trading hours, said the LSE.However, there would be a reduction in overlap with US and/or Asian trading hours, which might hit trading participants in those regions, it said. Changed hours would also – given that major trading desks are pan-European – mean all main European trading venues would need to be aligned, to maximise benefits.last_img read more

Much changed Irish side to face Iceland

first_imgMeanwhile FIFA will cover the cost of Seamus Coleman’s wages while he recovers from his horror injury.The Ireland captain suffered a double leg fracture on Friday night, and could be out of action until the start of next year.Under FIFA’s club protection programme, the world governing body will compensate Everton for his salary, which is believed to be over €55,000 a week. The Irish manager has been holding his first press conference since Seamus Coleman underwent surgery on a double leg fracture on Saturday morning.O’Neill says his captain is beginning to come to terms with the nature of the injury, and won’t put any timetable on his return.Robbie Brady will captain the side tomorrow in the absence of Coleman and a number of other senior players.last_img read more

Super sixth win for England’s girls

first_img England are Girls’ Home International champions again – winning the Stroyan Cup for the sixth year in a row. They achieved their success at St Annes Old Links, Lancashire, despite a final day defeat by Ireland. Scotland, the only team which could have caught them, also lost on the last day to Wales – meaning England’s earlier wins over Wales and Scotland were enough to retain the title. “A win is always good,” said England team captain Chris Pascall. “Only two of the girls had played Home Internationals before so it’s a very good result and they really did very well.” Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) and Olivia Winning (Rotherham) were both in last year’s winning team. This year’s successful side was completed by Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth), Sammy Fuller (Roehampton), Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted), Sophie Keech (Parkstone), Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe) and Sophie Madden (West Essex). In the final day’s match, England and Ireland were level pegging after the morning foursomes with 1½ points apiece. In the singles England managed 2½ points, thanks to Alice Hewson, Sammy Fuller and Sophie Lamb, losing overall by the narrow margin of 5-4. Ireland and Wales both finished with the week with 1½ pt each. On a countback of individual games won, Ireland had the edge (13½ to 11½) and that won them the Swansea Spoon as runners-up. Scotland finished last with 1pt. Friday results ENGLAND 4, IRELAND 5 Foursomes Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) and Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe)  beat Chloe  Weir and Julie McCarthy 2/1 and 1 Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth) and Sammy Fuller (Roehampton)  lost to Shannon Burke and Niamh Ward 1 hole Sophie Keech (Parkstone) and Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted) halved with Olivia  Mehaffey and Mary Doyle Singles Cowley lost to Mehaffey 6/4 Dimmock lost to Doyle 4/ 3 Hewson bt Niamh McSherry 4/ 2 Fuller bt Burke 2 /1 Olivia Winning (Rotherham) lost to Ward 2 down Lamb halved with Ariana Coyle Diez HOW THEY FINISHED 1 England  2 pt 2 Ireland   1 1/2pt (+13½ individual games won) 3 Wales 1 1/2 pt (+11½ individual games won) 4 Scotland 1pt. Next year’s Girls’ Home Internationals will be hosted by Donabate Golf Club, near Dublin from August 6 to 8 Caption: The winning England team with the Stroyan Cup. Back row, from left: Sammy Fuller, Alice Hewson, captain Chris Pascall, Gabriella Cowley and Sophie Lamb. Front row, from left: Olivia Winning, Sophie Keech, Sophie Madden and Annabel Dimmock. Image: Cal Carson Golf Agency. 8th August 2013 Girls stage a comeback to beat Scotland England, who are aiming to win the Stroyan Cup for a sixth year in a row, maintained their 100 per cent record at St Annes Old Links by coming from behind to beat Scotland 5½ -3½  on the second day of the Girls’ Home Internationals. In tomorrow’s final match England face Ireland, who drew 4½ -4½  with Wales in today’s other match. England trailed 2½-½ after this morning’s foursomes – but that halved match was all important. Annabel Dimmock and Sammy Fuller came back from three down with five to play to secure the half point – and to give the team some vital momentum. “To have lost 3-0 would have been a disaster but this gave us some momentum,” said team captain Chris Pascall. “The girls knew they would have to come out fighting – and they did.” Gabriella Cowley, Annabel Dimmock and Sophie Keech all secured their singles points before England suffered their only loss of the afternoon. But then, Olivia Winning crucially held her nerve through a testing hole to win her point and ensure the team could not be beaten. She won the 16th to go one up, but then put her tee shot out of bounds on the 17th. She responded by putting her next drive straight down the middle and firing her approach to within 18in of the pin and sinking the putt for a par five! Meanwhile, her opponent took six and the point belonged to England. Sophie Lamb completed the victory by winning her point on the 17th. England results Foursomes Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) & Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe) lost to Lauren Whyte & Connie Jaffrey 2/1 Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted) & Sophie Keech (Parkstone) lost to Clara Young & Tara MacTaggart 3/1 Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth) & Samantha Fuller (Roehampton) halved with Heather Munro & Fiona Liddell Singles Gabriella Cowley beat Lauren Whyte 4/2 Annabel Dimmock beat Lesley Atkins 3/2     Sophie Keech beat Tara MacTaggart 5/4 Sophie Madden (West Essex) lost to  Connie Jaffrey 5/4 Olivia Winning (Rotherham) beat Clara Young 2/1 Sophie Lamb beat Fiona Liddell 2/1   7th August 201 England girls in winning start at Home Internationals Defending champions England made a winning start at the Girls’ Home Internationals when they beat Wales 7-2 on the opening day at St Annes Old Links, Lancashire. The team were 2-1 up after the morning foursomes, when they were unbeaten with one win and two halved games. They built on those foundations with an excellent singles performance in the afternoon, winning five of the six matches and losing the other only on the last green In the day’s other match Scotland beat Ireland 5-4.  Tomorrow, England play Scotland. Foursomes pairings (Scotland names first): Lauren Whyte & Connie Jaffrey v Gabriella Cowley & Sophie Lamb      Clara Young & Tara MacTaggart v  Alice Hewson & Sophie Keech      Heather Munro & Fiona Liddell v  Annabel Dimmock & Samantha Fuller      Today’s results Foursomes Gabriella Cowley (Brocket Hall) & Sophie Lamb (Clitheroe) halved with Chloe Williams & Ella Griffiths Annabel Dimmock (Wentworth) & Samantha Fuller (Rohampton) beat Nia Greville & Megan Lockett 3/1 Sophie Madden (West Essex) & Alice Hewson (Berkhamsted) halved with Sadie Dewinton-Davies & Emma Miller Singles Cowley  beat Bethan Morris 4/3 Hewson beat Lockett 4/3 Sophie Keech (Parkstone) beat Williams 1 up Olivia Winning  (Rotherham) lost to Griffiths 2 down Dimmock beat Georgia Lewis 5/4 Lamb beat Miller 1 up 7 Aug 2013 Super sixth win for England’s girls last_img read more

High School Transition Resource Fair For Young Adults With Developmental Disabilities

first_imgTuesday, March 6, 20124:00 – 7:00 p.m.Labor & Industries Building7273 Linderson WayTumwater, WashingtonRefreshments will be served and the Fair is free and open to the public. Interpreter services and other special accommodations available by advanced request. For more information, contact Anne Butigan at 360-867-2520. Facebook2Tweet0Pin0OLYMPIA — Local, private, county and state organizations will come together for the Annual High School Transition Resource Fair for parents and young adults with special needs.The Resource Fair will provide parents and young adults with information regarding a wide range of services available in our community. While the event is aimed at providing information to parents and teens and young adults with developmental disabilities who will be graduating from high school within the next few years, any family with a child with special needs is welcome to attend.Representatives from approximately 25 organizations will be at the Fair to present information about available resources and there will be two breakout sessions, “Family Preparation for Adult Services:  An Overview & Timeline,” and “A School-to-Work Success Story.”The Resource Fair will be held:last_img read more

Canucks Defeat Coyotes 2-1 by Shootout in Dull, Boring Affair

first_img Luongo played solid all the way through until the last goal. The Canucks continued their physical play, outhitting Phoenix 28-20. It became a game of “chip the puck off the boards and out”, only to have it hammered back in deep.  Eventually, the Coyotes’ “strategy” (if you use the term loosely) worked out, with a couple bad plays in the Canucks end led to the tying goal.There were large stretches where the Canucks struggled to mount any offense, especially in the third period.  The Coyotes outshot the Canucks 7-2 in the final period.  It’s very common for the losing team to outshoot and outchance the frontrunner in the third period in the NHL, and tonight’s game was an example of this. That said, the lack of quality scoring chances by the Coyotes was astounding – for a team that was “pressing” to tie the game, their offense was almost nonexistent.Hockey is a tremendous sport and when played at its highest level, it can be a treat to watch.  Teams like the Coyotes are the antithesis to this, dumbing the game down to its basest levels.  They had reportedly been scoring more goals of late, especially during their recent five-game winning streak.  There was no evidence of this tonight. CANUCKS STRUGGLE TO CREATE OFFENSE – IS THIS MEANINGFUL?Vancouver struggled to mount much offense for large stretches of the game, and my immediate concern was “what would happen if we had to play them in the playoffs”?  It seemed like a potential recipe for disaster.However, there are reasons why a team like this would post a minimal threat to any of the top teams in the playoffs. While Phoenix excels at stifling the opposition, eventually the talent disparity would prove too much to overcome, especially over a seven game series.  All the top teams in the league can shut down and play stifling defense as well, when required – tonight’s game was evidence of that.Phoenix saw success on the penalty kill tonight by employing an extremely aggressive approach, not giving the Canucks any time to make plays.  Clearly this worked in a one-game situation, but I am comforted knowing that as soon as the twins figured this out, it would be very easy for them to find the weak spots and pick them apart.  I’m pretty sure that over a longer series, that style of PK would not be successful against the Canucks.The Canucks were only able to score once tonight, but I have a hard time believing they would be kept down for an entire series against a team like this.  For that reason – I just don’t see how a team like this would pose much of a threat. PARTING SHOTSQuick comments:  The most entertaining moment of the game occurred when late in the third period, after an icing call, Bieksa attempted to shoot the puck off the boards and catch it behind his back to give to the linesman.  I’m not kidding, that was the most entertaining play of the game. Hodgson nearly brought the crowd to its feet when he split the D in the first period before being stoned by LaBarbera.  Hodgson is showing improvement almost every time out. Virtually no Canucks stood out today.  Booth was the most noticeable and was named the game’s first star.center_img Leigh Ramsden lives in Vancouver and is an avid Canucks fan, having been a partial season ticket holder for over 10 years. He’s old enough to have witnessed all three Stanley Cup losses, as such, his prime goal is to remove those scars by seeing a Cup brought to Vancouver. Leigh is Fighting For Stanley’s (www.fightingforstanley.ca/vancouver) west coast correspondent, and will also blog after all Canuck games for The Nelson Daily.The Phoenix Coyotes came to Vancouver on Monday night hoping to increase their slim lead in the race for the final Western Conference playoff spot.  They were able to do so after earning a single point in a listless, dull affair eventually won by the Canucks in a shootout by the score of 2-1.The game tonight was one of the worst examples of NHL hockey I have ever had to lay eyes on.  Dull, boring, and tight-checking, the two teams almost choked the life out of each other before the Canucks finally won in the sixth round of the shootout. The Canucks had goals from Cody Hodgson, Alex Edler, David Booth, and Ryan Kesler in the skills competition, while Phoenix saw success from Ray Whitney, Gilbert Brule, and Mikkel Boedker.  Canuck netminder Roberto Luongo stoned Coyote shooter Boyd Gordon to seal the win.The Canucks only goal in regulation came off a nice play by David Booth, who took the puck around Keith Yandle after a deflected dump-in and was able to deke Phoenix goalie Jason LaBarbera and slide the puck home midway through the second period. Phoenix pressed a bit in the third period, and after a series of gaffes in the Canucks’ end, Yandle atoned for his mistake by surprising Luongo with a weak wrist shot that should never have found its way into the net.  The overtime was as uneventful as the rest of the game.It’s easy to blame Luongo for this one – he let in a horrible goal with only a couple of minutes left.  But even with this fact, he’s relatively blameless tonight.  It was like the entire team was put to sleep, and certainly you’d expect your offense to provide more than one goal.Perhaps the most telling statistic was the Canucks’ shot count:  four in the first period, a reasonable 13 in the second, and a farcical two in the third.  Neither team was able to generate much in the way of offense, as they continually broke up each other’s passes and plugged up the neutral zone.  While the ice generally isn’t too bad in Vancouver, the puck was continually bouncing around and being swatted at by both teams, it reminded me of my high-school intramural lunchtime floor hockey (i.e. no talent).  It was downright ugly hockey to watch.  If you missed this game, do not feel bad about it. IT’S NO WONDER NOBODY SUPPORTS HOCKEY IN PHOENIXThe most overriding thought I kept having was that it was no mystery why hockey isn’t surviving in the desert if this is the product that gets trotted out on the ice in a night to night basis.  Phoenix coach Dave Tippett is the new-age Jacques Lemaire, his defensive teachings imperative if his talent-challenged lineup is to have a chance to win games.The Canucks had decent stretches in the game and were able to sustain pressure on the Coyotes at various times – early in the first period, and throughout a good portion of the second.  However, in the third, they completely got lulled to sleep by their opponents.  The power play again looked better, but finished 0 for 3, including an almost four minute man-advantage in the first period.  The Canucks weren’t credited with many shots in that stretch, but did create a few chances. Coach Vigneault had Cinderella story Byron Bitz on the ice in the final couple minutes (good), but his was the final error that led to the Phoenix goal (bad) – tough luck for the big guy.Broadcast Observation of the Day:  One of John Shorthouse’s most annoying traits is his misuse of the phrase “throwing it up the middle”.  Every time someone makes a play in their own zone to the middle of the ice, he refers to it as “throwing it up the middle”. Risky passes from deep in your own zone, up the middle, should be referred to as that.  However, making a good play from the side boards to a forward with speed in the middle of the ice is a staple of a great breakout, which the Canucks have. They are very different things, and referring to each of them as the same thing (and insinuating that a good play is one fraught with unnecessary risk) is misleading to the viewer, and I wish he’d cut it out.Looking ahead: Vancouver hosts the Colorado Avalanche on Wednesday night in the Canucks’ third consecutive game against a team vying for the eighth and final playoff spot.last_img read more