Samsung and Xiaomi Lead Indias 4G Smartphone Market Lenovo A6000 Becomes Most

first_imgThe budget Android smartphone, Lenovo A6000 became the highest sold 4G smartphone in IndiaAnirban RoyThough the percentage of 4G smartphone users is relatively small compared to budget 3G smartphone market, the number of users is not really poor.In the first financial quarter of 2015, 2.2 million 4G LTE smartphones have been shipped in the country. And not surprisingly, Samsung took a stride to dethrone Apple from the No 1 spot.Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi stood second with a market share of 17%, while Samsung achieved 27%. Apple came third with a share of 15%.According to the CMR analysts, Samsung reached the No. 1 spot due to its latest smartphones Galaxy A5, Galaxy A6 and Galaxy S6. But interestingly, the most popular smartphone in this quarter is the Lenovo made budget smartphone A6000.Interestingly, other popular smartphone makers like Huawei, Blackberry and ZTE have also made a debut on the list. “Other than the need to appear distinctive in the market as well as move with worldwide industry trends, device vendors are also trying to create a ‘cult’ follower-ship in the emerging Broadband Wireless Access technology space,” said Faisal Kawoosa, Lead Analyst, CyberMedia Research.”New brands entering this segment during the quarter were Huawei, Blackberry and ZTE. The total number of players shipping 4G/LTE devices in the quarter were 19, up from 12 in the previous quarter,” added analyst Vikrant Singh, according to an Indian Express report.”The total models of 4G/LTE handsets shipped during the January-March 2015 quarter were 55, with Lenovo’s A6000 leading with maximum units.”According to the CyberMedia report, the number of 4G LTE devices increased from 1.06 million (Oct-Dec, 2014) to 2.2 million this quarter, out of which 97% devices are LTE based smartphones. The rest of the devices includes 4G-LTE datacards with a share of 2.64%, out of which ZTE gained 77% followed by Alcatel’s 17% and Huawei’s 5% share.last_img read more

An ordinary fare

first_imgBetween 1 to 2 pm only on Mondays madam, says the voice on the other end when I call up to confirm if walk-in is an option for outsiders in Rajasthan Bhawan’s canteen. Sensing my interest in the Rajasthani cuisine, he immediately adds that anybody could walk-in on any day of the week but the Rajasthani thali or platter is a once-a-week affair at the canteen. So, I waited for almost a week for that preordained lunch hour to gorge on the delicious Rajasthani platter here in the Capital. And when the day approached, monsoon, with all its splendour, had finally arrived in the Capital, casting a perfect setting for my lunch. I started out early to make it on time; well, I had only a bracketed hour-long time for the meal.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Walking inside the foyer of Rajasthan Bhawan, I glided down a step of stairs to find the canteen in a corner. A sizeable window in the canteen peeps into a hall with tables dressed in white linen and plastic covers set around wooden seats. Amongst the first few to arrive, I was delighted to make it on time. The attendant however informed me that I was early for lunch and food will be served by 1 pm. By and by, the hall started filling up with seemingly in-house guests and bureaucrats and it was half past 1 by the time the thalis made their first appearance. Indian Standard Time dutifully observed! Turning into a one man army, one attendant whizzed around the hall distributing thalis. By the time my moderately warm thali arrived, it was well past 1:30 pm.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixI scanned the thali and noticed the special daal-baati-churma alongside a dish of mix vegetable, gatta curry (gram flour dumplings in curry), rice and chapatis. Baati was bang on, crunchy and smoky in texture and the finely coarse churmawas mildly sweet. But what remained elusive was the conspicuous absence of ghee in the course. What stood out for me was the simple and tangy gatta curry.I have never imagined eating daal-baati-churma without ghee; it seems dry and takes down the entire experience by several notches. Well, the food came in late, the ghee never arrived, and there was nothing in the tapestry or up on the walls to hook onto.  Give this one a miss, without batting an eyelid.Meal for two : Rs 220 onwardslast_img read more

Want to Get Into the App Business Try Buying One

first_img min read Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. May 11, 2012 Listen Nowcenter_img There are other online app markets, including SellMyApplication.com, but Apptopia is among the most developed conceptually and is particularly helpful in shepherding users through the sales process.The idea is to create a Web win-win. Developers can turn their code into cash and entrepreneurs can find ready-made online businesses that they can then turn around and sell again.There are a number of issues Apptopia aims to address. First, Kay and his co-founder, Apptopia CEO Eliran Sapir, noticed entrepreneurs spending money to build apps that already exist. Meanwhile, developers are constantly looking to unload their apps — even apps with lots of downloads. Not every developer is a born entrepreneur and many aren’t interested in the administrative end, including the time it takes to support a successful app.“If they could get four or five thousand dollars that’s awesome because it helps fuel the project they’re excited about now,” Kay says.To start bidding, users simply sign up with their email address. The rest will be familiar to anyone who has bought items on eBay. Users fill out a profile, browse listings of apps and then place bids on the ones they want to buy, starting with a minimum bid set by the seller. In some cases, apps can be bought outright for a set price.The average Apptopia purchase hovers around $7,500, but many apps are available for much less. Potential buyers don’t even need a login to navigate the site, which is searchable by category, downloads, bid price and monthly revenues. Shoppers can then view statistics about their potential purchases, which are updated daily.Related: Camera+: An Apps to Riches StoryThe data is easy to read, but interpreting the numbers is the real trick. Good apps might appear to perform poorly because they are relatively new or because they’ve been marketed poorly. Others might be legitimate fixer-uppers. Ultimately, buyers have to rely on their best business sense before taking out a flyer on an app.What to do with an app once it’s purchased is up to the new owner. Jean-Marie Truelle, a New York-based investor, uses Apptopia to buy apps for his own bootstrapped mobile publishing company, JMT Apps. The real magic to Apptopia, he says, is how it simplifies the crowded app marketplace.”Apptopia gives the opportunity to find valuable apps with comprehensive information at a fair price,” says Truelle.Making money on apps can be a tricky business, but Apptopia makes it at least theoretically possible for the smallest investors to get started. Savvy entrepreneurs can buy a niche app, figure out what needs to be improved and find a talented mobile developer to execute those changes, Kay says.“You’re buying an asset with some revenue stream. … It’s unlikely that you will lose your entire investment,” he says. Related: There’s an App Maker for That Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer In the crowded business of smartphone and tablet apps, the money might not be in building apps from scratch, but in flipping them.One way to get started is with Apptopia, a Cambridge, Mass.-based startup that enables developers, businesses and investors to buy and sell apps in online auctions. The site, which launched in April, provides everything from valuation to escrow services and intellectual property transfer.“Essentially what we’re trying to do is broker mobile app acquisitions in an eBay style,” says founder and COO Jonathan Kay.last_img read more