Ireland West Airport launch exclusive Donegal Daily Reader Offer

first_imgJust in time for spring getaways, Ireland West Airport Knock is presenting a new and exclusive offer on parking for Donegal Daily readers.Ireland West Airport offers over 1,500 accessible car parking spaces within minutes walk of the terminal at excellent rates.When you book your parking direct and online with Ireland West Airport you’re guaranteed the best price – with savings of up to 30% compared to the gate price. Enter Promo Code “DONEGALDAILY” to qualify for an additional 10% discount off the current cheapest online price for airport parking at Ireland West Airport.This offer is only valid for bookings made online up to midnight on Sunday 31st March and is available for travel at any stage up until 30th June 2019!For the best parking rates click here to prebook your parking online: https://prebook-irelandwestairport.com/ Ryanair announces new flights from Knock to TenerifeIreland West Airport launch exclusive Donegal Daily Reader Offer was last modified: March 5th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:car parking airport parkingIRELAND WEST AIRPORT KNOCKpromo codereader offerlast_img read more

How Long Can Comets Bust Up and Re-form?

first_imgIf comets repeatedly break up and re-coagulate, how long could that recur?A new paper in Nature from the Rosetta team suggests a strange new theory about comets. Their Comet 67P has two prominent lobes, like a dumbbell, but it’s not unique. Four other comet nuclei also have a bilobed appearance. This suggests a new theory of how they got that way:Here, we study the structure and dynamics of 67P’s nucleus. We find that sublimation torques have caused the nucleus to spin up in the past to form the large cracks observed on its neck. However, the chaotic evolution of its spin state has so far forestalled its splitting, although it should eventually reach a rapid enough spin rate to do so. Once this occurs, the separated components will be unable to escape each other; they will orbit each other for a time, ultimately undergoing a low-speed merger that will result in a new bilobate configuration. The components of four other imaged bilobate nuclei have volume ratios that are consistent with a similar reconfiguration cycle, pointing to such cycles as a fundamental process in the evolution of short-period comet nuclei. It has been shown that comets were not strong contributors to the so-called late heavy bombardment about 4 billion years ago. The reconfiguration process suggested here would preferentially decimate comet nuclei during migration to the inner solar system, perhaps explaining this lack of a substantial cometary flux.It’s a destructive process, in other words. How long could that go on?This is grist for someone’s research mill – someone open to the idea that billions of years are neither necessary nor empirically tenable. (Visited 21 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Independent Power Producers chosen

first_img“The success of renewable energy hinges on the financial sector,” she said, adding that bidders that were having trouble before the financial close to speak up. “I would want to appeal to those bidders that are already experiencing challenges to come to the fore. It is an appeal for the benefit of the number of jobs that will not be realised if there’s no financial support,” said Peters. In December, the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) announced that it will finance 12 of the 28 preferred bidders to contribute to the country’s energy mix. The financing will be to the tune of R5.2-billion. Meanwhile, Peters said the department has started talking to financial institutions. “Job creation per province, we’ve seen a small reduction from bid window 1 but the bidders have indicated that on the total 7 059 jobs created in the construction period and 328 jobs created in the operation of the life of the plant,” said Magubane. “In this window, the department received 79 bids of which 51 met the qualification criteria as per the Request for Proposals. Given the megawatts limitation and competition, only 19 bidders were selected as preferred bidders for Window 2,” Energy Minister Dipuo Peters said in Pretoria on Monday. Growing the economy In the first window some of the challenges faced by bidders were that they had trouble reaching the financial close, of which June is the financial close for window1 project proposals. The minister said there had been informal conversation regarding companies experiencing financial strain. “With them not coming to the fore this would mean that we’re not going to deliver on the megawatts that we want,” she said. According to the IRP2010 – which is a 20-year projection on electricity supply and demand – about 42% of electricity generated in South Africa is required to come from renewable resources. The department has set aside 100MW of the 3 725MW for smaller projects of less than 5MW. Of the selected bidders, nine were selected for the solar photovoltaic technology, seven for wind, two for small hydro and one for concentrated solar thermal (CSP). 23 May 2012 Additionally there have been significant increases in the local content from 28.5% in window 1 to 47.5% in bid window 2 in solar photovoltaic technology. The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP2010) places specific emphasis on broadening electricity supply technologies to include gas, imports, nuclear, biomass, renewables (wind, solar and hydro), in response to both the country’s future electricity needs as well as reduce its CO2 emissions. For small hydro 13.3MW has been taken up from a maximum allocated for round 2 at 75MW while for CSP the allocated maximum 50MW has been taken up. In the 2nd window a total 1 043.9MW has been taken up by bidders. Ompie Aphane, Deputy Director General for Electricity, Nuclear and Clean Energy at the department said the department was not sure of the amount of projects that were in financial strain. Last year, the Department of Energy announced 28 preferred bidders, out of a total of 53 applications for the IPP bid process in the first window. Japser Power Company, Solar Capital De Aar 3 and Sishen Solar Facility were among the bidders selected for solar photovoltaic technology; while West Coast 1 and Grassridge form part of the 7 selected for wind and Stortemelk Hydro (Pty) Ltd and Neusberg Hydro Electric Project A were selected for small hydro. For CSP Bokpoort CSP project was selected. The department has noted that under window 2, the level of commitment to economic development has improved compared to window 1. “More communities will benefit through employment or as shareholding in these projects,” said the minister, adding that most bidders in window 2 will establish community trusts aimed at developing surrounding communities.center_img What the department had noted, said Director General Nelisiwe Magubane, was that there were “significant” changes in several areas like pricing whereby in solar photovoltaic in window 1 on average was at about 2.75 per kWh. “We’ve seen a significant reduction in price of about R1.65 per kWh for window 2,” she said. Projects allocated The department has yet to decide on when bidding will commence for projects to take part in window 3. A full list of bidders is available on the Independent Power Producers programme website. Peters said government saw the programme as an opportunity to grow the economy given the numbers of unemployed people while the procurement of alternative energy is also aimed at alleviating energy constraints. Appeal to financial sector Integrated Resource Plan For Solar photovoltaic 417MW have been taken up by bidders with the maximum MW allocated for round 2 at 450; for wind 562.5MW has been taken up with the maximum allocation at 650MW. The names of 19 bidders – who have been selected as the preferred bidders for Window 2 of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producers (IPP) programme that will contribute to South Africa’s energy mix – were announced on Monday. The bidding for window 2 closed on 5 March with the total 79 bids received. These bids amount to 3 255MW while the cap was at 1 275MW. Source: BuaNews Peters appealed to the country’s financial sector to provide financing to bidders. South Africa wants to procure 3 725MW of renewable energy through this process. The programme also seeks to make provision for local content in the provision of alternative energy sources while the bids were evaluated by technical, financial, legal and international reviewers. The minister called on prospective bidders for the remaining three windows that they need not necessary own the land on which projects will operate on. Bidders could co-exist. “We don’t want to lose arable land,” said Peters adding that bidders could share the same piece of land with farmers.last_img read more

Helping Military Families Become More Resilient Through Various Transitions

first_imgWhy do some military families bounce back after stressful transitions (e.g., transitioning into civilian life), while others struggle to readjust?Cover image and logo– used with permission from the MilitaryTimes.com Below are practical applications for strengthening individual and family processes for resilience. These implications are a collection of examples from various researchers who have studied resilience and military families (2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12). Implications for Building Resilience in Military Families Assist family members in drawing upon various strengths. For example, the ability to reduce conflict during a taxing deployment.Help families adapt to a new normal. Assist them in providing clear information for adapting to the change; helping them to accept the things they cannot change.Support connectedness through fostering nurturing and loving relationships among all family members and by making community support available and accessible.Invite all family members to engage in joint participation and shared decision making. For example, deciding as a family where to vacation when the service member returns from training.Help identify potential triggers that may evoke stressful memories. This is especially important to consider in service members with posttraumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injuries.Enhance shared meaning making and making meaning of adversity. For example, allow family members to share personal perspectives on challenges and successes experienced during deployment.Allow family members to openly share positive and negative emotions experienced throughout various military transitions. This could be done by reaching out to family members at several time points during each transition.Aid in identifying and anticipating stressful transitions or situations. For example, have families create a list of the potential challenges (or joys) they may experience when relocating (e.g., PCSing overseas).Coach families to develop a shared method for checking in on one another’s emotional or stress status. For instance, parents can check in with their children by asking them to share their fears and joys during deployments.Support military families in utilizing healthy coping strategies, such as relaxation or distraction; diverging away from drinking alcohol or spending excessive amounts of money as a means of coping.Foster a positive outlook through hope, faith, or optimism. For example, help family members gain a sense of personal perspective that their life has meaning and purpose.Encourage the reestablishment of individual and family routines and rituals while the service member is away. This might include the continuation of family game night or reassigning household responsibilities.Finally, we can teach family members how to create and set forth on personal goals in hopes of fostering self-efficacy and a sense of purpose.For more resources on helping military families maintain resilience and overcome transition-related challenges, be sure to head on over to our Family Transitions page! Also, be sure to take a look at our upcoming Resilience Series which will focus on promoting protective factors to support personal, family and community resilience. This three-part webinar series will take place on August 20th, 22nd, and 27th, so be sure to RSVP today! This article was written by Jennifer Rea, PhD and military spouse to an Active Duty Marine. Jenny consults with the MFLN Family Transitions team to support professional development for military family service providers. You may find more blogs, podcasts and webinars from Family Transitions here. We invite you to engage with Family Transitions on Twitter @MFLNFT and with MFLN on Facebook @MilitaryFamilies.References 1.  Masten, A. S. (2013). Competence, risk, and resilience in military families: Conceptual commentary. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 16(3), 278-281.2.  Walsh, F. (2016). Applying a family resilience framework in training, practice, and research: Mastering the art of the possible. Family Process, 55(4), 616-632.3.  Mancini, J. A., O’Neal, C. W., Martin, J. A., & Bowen, G. L. (2018). Community social organization and military families: Theoretical perspectives on transitions, contexts, and resilience. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 10(3), 550-565.4.  Meadows, S. O., Beckett, M. K., Bowling, K., Golinelli, D., Fisher, M. P., Martin, L. T., … & Osilla, K. C. (2016). Family resilience in the military: Definitions, models, and policies. Rand Health Quarterly, 5(3),12.5.  Masten, A. S. (2018). Resilience theory and research on children and families: Past, present, and promise. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 10(1), 12-31.6.  Masten, A. S., & Cicchetti, D. (2016). Resilience in development: Progress and transformation. Developmental Psychopathology, 1-63.7.  Ungar, M. (2018). Systemic resilience: principles and processes for a science of change in contexts of adversity. Ecology and Society, 23(4):34.8.  Clark, M., O’Neal, C. W., Conley, K., & Mancini, J. A. (2018). Resilient family processes, personal reintegration, and subjective well-being outcomes for military personnel and their family members. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 88(1), 99–111. https://.org/10.1037/ort00002789.  Saltzman, W. R., Lester, P., Beardslee, W. R., Layne, C. M., Woodward, K., & Nash, W. P. (2011). Mechanisms of risk and resilience in military families: Theoretical and empirical basis of a family-focused resilience enhancement program. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 14(3), 213-230.10.  Gewirtz, A. H., Pinna, K. L., Hanson, S. K., & Brockberg, D. (2014). Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: After deployment, adaptive parenting tools. Psychological Services, 11(1), 31.11.  Cox, K., Grand-Clement, S., Galai, K., Flint, R., & Hall, A. (2018). Understanding resilience as it affects the transition from the UK Armed Forces to civilian life. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation. Retrieved from https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR2436.html.12.  Wright, K. M., Riviere, L. A., Merrill, J. C., & Cabrera, O. A. (2013). Resilience in military families: A review of programs and empirical evidence. Building Psychological Resilience in Military Personnel: Theory and Practice, 167-191. doi: 10.1037/14190‐008 by Jennifer Rea, PhD Military life is dynamic and interrelated with its own life challenges (1).  Service members and their families face unique stressors in the various transitions they face (e.g., frequent moves). While, many have the ability to cope with and overcome transition difficulties, other military families may need additional support.As military families face more stressors and hurdles, they often emerge stronger, more loving and more purposeful in their lives (2).  Through each transitional challenge, many military families are expected to maintain resilience all the while minimize family vulnerabilities (3).What is Resilience?Resilience “occurs in the face of adversity and is reflected in individuals and families ‘bouncing back’ after hardship”(2,3).  As a “process that occurs over the life course” (4).  resilience is the capacity to adapt to several new transitions and challenges (5).Resilient Individuals and Families are not Islands unto Themselves.Individuals are embedded in families and families are embedded in communities (6).  That is, individual resilience is dependent upon the systems the individual interacts with, including one’s family and their community (7).  For example, military unit support and community connectedness have been found to be related to family well-being and adaptation to transitions (3).Tools for Building Individual and Family ResilienceFamily processes; things families do (e.g., effective communication), are important to identify as they influence individual and family resilience (8).  As overlooked tools, some family processes are qualities an individual (or family) possesses allowing them to flourish during adversity (9).To build resilience among military families, we must help them recognize their untapped capabilities and reconnect them to sources of sustenance and nurturance. By doing so, we can scaffold their way to becoming more resilient through successfully navigating military life transitions (9).Cover image and logo– used with permission from the U.S. Dept of Defense.last_img read more

Too Little, Too Inconsistently, for Too Long

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now Too Little Activity: If your results this year are not what you wanted them to be, it is likely that you did too little activity to generate those results. The results that you wanted would have required that you take massive action (and still do). Dabbling here and there isn’t how you generate transformational, breakthrough, and breakout results. Too little activity is how you fail.Taken Too Inconsistently: You sometimes took the action you needed to take, for sure. On some days you did what would was required of you in order to reach your goals. That was some days, not every day. Taking action inconsistently doesn’t produce inconsistent results; it produces no results. That is the real difference between sometimes and always.For Too Long: This year is over. But there isn’t anything you can do to produce a better result now. As much as it pains me to tell you this, the first quarter of next year is already over, too. The better results you want in the first quarter of next year would have to have been built over the last two quarters. Too little activity, taken to inconsistently, for too long equals missed goals.Your recipe for next year is massive action, taken consistently, throughout the entire year. Start today. Start right now. It’s not too late to start working on next year.QuestionsLook at your biggest and most important goal. Have you taken massive action?Have you pursued that goal with a fervor that borders on religious?Have you taken that action over a long period of time?What part of this recipe needs to change?last_img read more

Researchers simulate information signaling between cells

first_img Citation: Researchers simulate information signaling between cells (2015, October 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-10-simulate-cells.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—Many natural systems are described by dynamics of traveling wavefronts. Sharp traveling fronts are employed in countless phenomena, including fluid convection, chemical reactions, and cellular phenomena. Living systems use front propagation encoded in biochemical reactions to communicate and perform computations, but these dynamics are difficult to study in three dimensions (i.e., in vivo). Thus, to understand how propagating gene expression fronts work in complex living systems, it is important to study how they work in minimal systems. Artificial cells act like the real thing More information: “Propagating gene expression fronts in a one-dimensional coupled system of artificial cells.” Nature Physics (2015) DOI: 10.1038/nphys3469AbstractLiving systems employ front propagation and spatiotemporal patterns encoded in biochemical reactions for communication, self-organization and computation. Emulating such dynamics in minimal systems is important for understanding physical principles in living cells and in vitro. Here, we report a one-dimensional array of DNA compartments in a silicon chip as a coupled system of artificial cells, offering the means to implement reaction–diffusion dynamics by integrated genetic circuits and chip geometry. Using a bistable circuit we programmed a front of protein synthesis propagating in the array as a cascade of signal amplification and short-range diffusion. The front velocity is maximal at a saddle-node bifurcation from a bistable regime with travelling fronts to a monostable regime that is spatially homogeneous. Near the bifurcation the system exhibits large variability between compartments, providing a possible mechanism for population diversity. This demonstrates that on-chip integrated gene circuits are dynamical systems driving spatiotemporal patterns, cellular variability and symmetry breaking. Explore further © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Nature Physics A group of researchers in Israel and the United States report in Nature Physics the results of a study of a one-dimensional array of artificial cells in a silicon chip—in essence, a system of coupled cells in which the researchers could implement reaction-diffusion effects and study how they propagate among cells.Artificial cells?Artificial cells are engineered systems of various kinds that simulate a number of functions of biological cells. In this case, the array of cells consists of 15 compartments inside which the researchers patterned gene circuits. The compartments simulate the microencapsulation of the biological membranes of cells, separating the internal cellular mechanisms from other “cells” while allowing the exchange of small molecules.Carved into a silicon substrate, the compartments were fed by a main flow channel and interconnected by fork-shaped capillaries. Cell extract from Escherichia coli was fed continuously through the main channel. The researchers were interested in how biological multicellular systems use traveling wavefronts to communicate. Signals dissipate over short distances within a medium, so cells accomplish long-range transmission of information by consecutive local cell-to-cell interactions. In living systems, the transmission models are too complex to study, but this isolated array of artificial cells revealed interesting dynamics likely applicable to the study of actual multicellular systems.Though front propagation has been studied in the past, yielding results that have applications in science and industry, the authors note that this is the first time anyone has created a synthetic, spatially coupled cellular system capable of long-range cell-to-cell communication. The first compartment was patterned with a small amount of starter protein construct, and as the medium flowed through the channels, the researchers found that the DNA starter initiated diffusion of the activator to the neighboring compartment. This created an autocatalytic reaction in which the neighboring compartment created a new source of activator. The researchers characterized expression-diffusion dynamics by measuring the timescales between the diffusion of proteins along the capillaries, which occurred over minutes, and the gene expression dynamics in the compartments, which changed over hours. In essence, the researchers created a system of autocatalyzing protein synthesis in which the activator signal cascaded through the compartments, which amplified it and diffused it to neighboring compartments. The authors write, “The spatial organization of DNA circuits together with short interaction length, set by the array geometry, will allow integrating long-range signaling with local information processing reactions based on gene expression, in analogy to multicellular systems, electronic circuits, and neural networks.”last_img read more