Down with Human Evolution Just-So Stories

first_imgStories of human ancestors around campfires evolving larger brains by eating meat or caring for animals often sound themselves life campfire stories.  For example, Jeremy Hsu in Live Science speculated that “Caring for Animals May Have Shaped Human Evolution.”  A cute girl with a puppy adorns the article.  “Our love of all things furry has deep roots in human evolution and may have even shaped how our ancestors developed language and other tools of civilization.”  For another example, see the 06/10/2010 entry on why humans became hairless.    Paleoanthropologist John Hawks has had enough of this tale-telling.  “‘Just-so stories [are] driving me crazy,” he exclaimed in a rare outburst against reporters and those in his own field on his John Hawks Weblog.  Responding to one such story, the idea that eating meat gave humans bigger brains (12/20/2009), he showed how to ask skeptical questions: “How did meat make us smarter?  Is it a magical meat property?  If I fed enough meat to the local deer, would they get smarter?”  He did not reject the evolutionary tales outright: “These are serious hypotheses with literature and evidence supporting them,” he claimed, but then he blushed on his colleagues’ behalf: “I just wish that they could be reported in a way that made it sound like paleoanthropologists are skeptical scientists!”Thank you, John.  Join our campaign to clean up science by ridding it of storytelling.  Just watch the ground under your feet.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Fighting agricultural Afropessimism

first_img“I often hear it said that Africa is runningout of food per head,” says analyst SteveWiggins. “Now unless these statistics arecomplete and utter junk, that just simplyisn’t true. The index shows 16%, 17%,18% more food being produced per capitacompared to the early 1980s.”(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com imagelibrary)MEDIA CONTACTS• Overseas Development InstituteGareth ThomasActing Media and Public Affairs Officer+44 20 7922 0431media@odi.org.ukGillian HartDirector of Communications+44 (0)20 7922 0386g.hart@odi.org.uk• International Food Policy ResearchInstituteMichael Rubinstein+1 202 862 5670m.rubinstein@cgiar.orgMichele Pietrowski+1 202 862 4630m.pietrowski@cgiar.orgAbid Aslam+1 202-862-4611a.aslam@cgiar.org• Future Agricultures Consortiuminfo@future-agricultures.orgSuddenly, after 20 years of relative neglect, African agriculture is a hot topic, with a substantial growth in production and a new interest among major donors in funding the sector.That is the message emerging from the African Seminars Series now taking place in London, a gathering that examines the constraints and opportunities facing Africa’s farmers.The figures being presented are impressive and, according to Steve Wiggins, who leads the agriculture programme at Britain’s Overseas Development Institute, confound the pessimists who assume the situation to be much worse than it is.“I often hear it said that Africa is running out of food per head,” he told the seminar. “Now unless these statistics are complete and utter junk, that just simply isn’t true. The index shows 16%, 17%, 18% more food being produced per capita compared to the early 1980s.”In particular, he said, two regions – West Africa and North Africa – were surging ahead, although there were signs that production in East Africa too might now be beginning to accelerate.“For those of us working on Africa, people use Asia as a stick to beat us with,” Wiggins said. “Well, as far as I can see, there are two bits of Africa there which have done every bit as well as Asia has done over the last quarter of a century.”Wiggins’s fellow speaker at the opening session was Ousman Badiane, the Africa director of the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington. He put his finger on the mid nineties as the point when Africa really turned a corner.With no other overall change which could account for this recovery, Badiane attributed it to the structural adjustment programmes which so many countries had been persuaded to follow.“I believe it was the result of those strong and messy reform programmes of the 1980s. I remember the pain of it, but it completely changed the environment for agriculture.”Challenges, opportunitiesBoth speakers were agreed that the food price spike in 2008 and the world economic crisis pose both challenges and opportunities for African farmers. They worried about a growing protectionism in Asia – a major potential market for African agricultural produce – and about the fact that the speed of Asian development may have closed a window of opportunity for African’s own industrialisation.As Steve Wiggens said, “The single biggest stimulus to most farmers is a thriving local city.”Above all they worried that the gains of the last 20 years might be reversed. Ousman Badiane referred to a new law passed in Kenya to restore price controls on agricultural produce.“That’s where Kenya was 25 years ago,” he said. “The danger is that the generation of leaders that went through the pains of those reforms are no longer active. So those leaders today can make the same mistakes as the leaders of 25 years ago.”He added: “It is just for me unimaginable that a farmer stands up every day, produces the food and someone claims that is a common good: – ‘It’s our rice, it’s our maize.’ It’s amazing. Nobody goes to the farm with them, but once they produce the product, everybody claims it as their own. That has to change. It’s a private product; it belongs to the farmers. And they have to be able to sell it for the price that the market offers.”Comprehensive developmentOusmane Badiane sees the African Union‘s Comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme (Caadep), in so far as it gives a voice to farmers, as an influence against this kind of reversal of policies.The first two seminars both sparked discussion of Caadep, which obliges member governments to devote 10% of their national budgets to agriculture and encourages them to produce a coherent plan to which donors can subscribe.But there was a considerable level of scepticism about Caadep. One participant, currently working in Malawi, described the frantic rush to produce a programme to put before donors, and said he had seen no evidence of new money becoming available.This was echoed by Christie Peacock, chief executive officer of the NGO Farm Africa. “There’s so little vision,” she said. “I’m very sceptical about the Caadep process. It’s supposed to be African led, but it’s often a very top-down process.”She echoed the reservations expressed by several participants, that even if new money was now being offered for agricultural development, both through Caadep and from the US government’s Feed the Future programme, there was no well-thought-out plan about how it should be used. “I think we are visionless at the moment,” Peacock said, “and after 20 years of lack of interest, we are in danger of reinventing the wheel all over again.”But the keynote speaker at the second seminar, Professor Sir Gordon Conway, author of The Doubly Green Revolution, was more optimistic about funding: “I do think there will be money – about a billion dollars of USAid [US Agency for International Development] money this year, and a billion plus next. Not perhaps the $3.5-billion that has been talked about, but around $2.7-billion will be there.”“Twenty years ago there was a view that African didn’t need agricultural development, that the private sector would do it all, and among some donor agencies that view is still there. But as a result of the food price crisis we have things like the Feed the Future programme, which looks for countries’ own plans. It recognises that countries are different, asks what they intend to do, and acts accordingly, and I think that’s quite a good approach.”The African Seminar Series is organised by the Future Agricultures Consortium and the Overseas Development Institute. Further sessions on markets, land issues and agriculture-led development in an urbanizing world will take place between now and the beginning of September.Source: Irin Newslast_img read more

E Cape farmers in ‘green’ dairy venture

first_img18 July 2011A newly established South African dairy company has taken the lead in milk processing, and boasts the smallest carbon footprint of any dairy in the southern hemisphere.The idea to establish a dairy with green credentials came about in 2010, when a group of Eastern Cape dairy farmers decided that they wanted to create a facility that could add value to locally produced milk. The farmers wanted to maintain the high quality of their products, but also had a vision to process milk using more eco-friendly methods.The Coega Dairy initially invested R50-million (US$7.3-million) in advanced ultra-high temperature (UHT) processing equipment that makes it possible to produce UHT milk, also known as long life milk, more efficiently.Coega Dairy CEO Dr Hennie Kleynhans said that no other dairy in the region or on the continent has invested in the advanced technology, known as OneStep, and internationally, he is only aware of a dairy in Spain that is using it.According to Kleynhans, this is because the technology is new in the market and besides being very expensive to install, would require dairies to undergo a complete overhaul of existing infrastructure.However, given the cost squeeze on dairy producers in South Africa, Coega Dairy deemed the investment worthwhile.Local trade magazine DairyConnect reports that South African milk producers face tough competition from countries where milk can be produced more competitively or where farmers receive subsidies. In South Africa, producers also have to contend with increasing input costs and low producer prices.The founders of the Coega Dairy realised that the technology could help them overcome some of these challenges: it allows for more eco-friendly milk production while also performing exceptionally on cost savings.Investing in the best green technologyCoega Dairy’s marketing director Marlize Smit said that the new UHT processing plant is significantly more efficient than conventional UHT equipment used in other South African plants.The Coega plant makes use of OneStep technology, which reduces the need for various steps during production. This means that milk can be processed faster, using fewer resources, at a lower cost.Energy and water consumption is considerably reduced, while the end products, which also include butter and custards, still maintain their high quality and have enhanced taste profiles.“The new plant is one of the most modern UHT plants, and one of the top green dairy plants in the world,” Smit said.The processing unit uses half as much energy, water and chemicals and generates 50% less effluent, of which 65% is recycled. The technology cuts carbon dioxide emissions by 40%, which results in a lower carbon footprint compared to world average values.According to Kleynhans, ordinary dairy plants use three litres of water to produce one litre of milk. In comparison, the OneStep technology makes it possible to use only 300ml of water per litre of milk. He noted that some dairies can use less water using traditional technology, but this is difficult as it requires extreme efficiency.Greening the dairy industryThe dairy industry struggles with eco-friendly operations. Production plants require daily cleaning, and this uses large quantities of water and chemicals. Cleaning chemicals are expensive and once used, are released in the effluent, which could harm the environment.“Many dairies do treat their water, but this is still not efficient,” said Kleynhans. Unlike traditional dairy plants, the OneStep technology design only requires cleaning every 60 hours, using fewer chemicals. This means less water and fewer chemicals, but an increase in production time, as less downtime has to be scheduled for cleaning.Establishing a green dairy and sourcing milk from farmers using eco-friendly farming methods is a step in the right direction for the local dairy industry. For the consumer, it also shows that farmers and the rest of the value chain know how important it is to produce food and beverages more sustainably.The switch to green technology anticipates changing consumer demands.“Eastern Cape dairy farmers are being pro-active. Consumers expect green products these days. It isn’t an option anymore,” said Smit.The farmers are also working towards greening the entire value chain, from the farm to the consumer.Smit said that the Coega Dairy will source milk predominantly from pasture fed cows raised in the province’s unpolluted surroundings.Coega Dairy products will be packaged in paper cartons, of which the majority can be reclaimed and recycled to make new paper products. The milk will also not be transported over long distances, which reduces the logistics and transport carbon emissions.Representative ownershipAt the moment 13 commercial milk farmers own the Coega Dairy, but next year the ownership structure of the company will change to ensure a benefit for all participants in the value chain.By 2012, dairy farm workers, black farmers and farm managers and factory workers will own 40% of the company’s shares.Additionally, said Kleynhans, the dairy will have a further positive economic impact on the Eastern Cape by creating 350 direct and 750 indirect jobs.Towards the end of 2011 when the plant becomes operational, milk will be sourced from black owned and managed dairy farms, many of which are highly successful.“These farmers milk over 25 000 litres of milk daily,” said Kleynhans. “Some also own close to 2 000 cows and on a properly managed farm, farmers can milk 15 to 20 litres of milk per cow per day.”Ownership of the company will be expanded further to include joint ventures with Amadlelo, a black empowerment agri-business concern, with the purpose of training black farm managers through shared milk production.Construction underwayThe Coega Dairy is currently under construction at the Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) just outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape. It will be fully operational in October this year.Kleynhans said that with the infrastructure available, the road network and a reliable source of power at the Coega IDZ, it was the most suitable site for the new dairy.Extensive environmental impact assessments and relocation of vegetation, animals and insects were also undertaken before construction started.“Vegetation, animals, insects and even spiders, snakes and rats were relocated to a nearby site,” he said.Next year the Coega Dairy plans to install a second plant at the site. This will be valued at R192-million ($28.6-million) and will include value-adding equipment.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Independent Power Producers chosen

first_img“The success of renewable energy hinges on the financial sector,” she said, adding that bidders that were having trouble before the financial close to speak up. “I would want to appeal to those bidders that are already experiencing challenges to come to the fore. It is an appeal for the benefit of the number of jobs that will not be realised if there’s no financial support,” said Peters. In December, the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) announced that it will finance 12 of the 28 preferred bidders to contribute to the country’s energy mix. The financing will be to the tune of R5.2-billion. Meanwhile, Peters said the department has started talking to financial institutions. “Job creation per province, we’ve seen a small reduction from bid window 1 but the bidders have indicated that on the total 7 059 jobs created in the construction period and 328 jobs created in the operation of the life of the plant,” said Magubane. “In this window, the department received 79 bids of which 51 met the qualification criteria as per the Request for Proposals. Given the megawatts limitation and competition, only 19 bidders were selected as preferred bidders for Window 2,” Energy Minister Dipuo Peters said in Pretoria on Monday. Growing the economy In the first window some of the challenges faced by bidders were that they had trouble reaching the financial close, of which June is the financial close for window1 project proposals. The minister said there had been informal conversation regarding companies experiencing financial strain. “With them not coming to the fore this would mean that we’re not going to deliver on the megawatts that we want,” she said. According to the IRP2010 – which is a 20-year projection on electricity supply and demand – about 42% of electricity generated in South Africa is required to come from renewable resources. The department has set aside 100MW of the 3 725MW for smaller projects of less than 5MW. Of the selected bidders, nine were selected for the solar photovoltaic technology, seven for wind, two for small hydro and one for concentrated solar thermal (CSP). 23 May 2012 Additionally there have been significant increases in the local content from 28.5% in window 1 to 47.5% in bid window 2 in solar photovoltaic technology. The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP2010) places specific emphasis on broadening electricity supply technologies to include gas, imports, nuclear, biomass, renewables (wind, solar and hydro), in response to both the country’s future electricity needs as well as reduce its CO2 emissions. For small hydro 13.3MW has been taken up from a maximum allocated for round 2 at 75MW while for CSP the allocated maximum 50MW has been taken up. In the 2nd window a total 1 043.9MW has been taken up by bidders. Ompie Aphane, Deputy Director General for Electricity, Nuclear and Clean Energy at the department said the department was not sure of the amount of projects that were in financial strain. Last year, the Department of Energy announced 28 preferred bidders, out of a total of 53 applications for the IPP bid process in the first window. Japser Power Company, Solar Capital De Aar 3 and Sishen Solar Facility were among the bidders selected for solar photovoltaic technology; while West Coast 1 and Grassridge form part of the 7 selected for wind and Stortemelk Hydro (Pty) Ltd and Neusberg Hydro Electric Project A were selected for small hydro. For CSP Bokpoort CSP project was selected. The department has noted that under window 2, the level of commitment to economic development has improved compared to window 1. “More communities will benefit through employment or as shareholding in these projects,” said the minister, adding that most bidders in window 2 will establish community trusts aimed at developing surrounding communities.center_img What the department had noted, said Director General Nelisiwe Magubane, was that there were “significant” changes in several areas like pricing whereby in solar photovoltaic in window 1 on average was at about 2.75 per kWh. “We’ve seen a significant reduction in price of about R1.65 per kWh for window 2,” she said. Projects allocated The department has yet to decide on when bidding will commence for projects to take part in window 3. A full list of bidders is available on the Independent Power Producers programme website. Peters said government saw the programme as an opportunity to grow the economy given the numbers of unemployed people while the procurement of alternative energy is also aimed at alleviating energy constraints. Appeal to financial sector Integrated Resource Plan For Solar photovoltaic 417MW have been taken up by bidders with the maximum MW allocated for round 2 at 450; for wind 562.5MW has been taken up with the maximum allocation at 650MW. The names of 19 bidders – who have been selected as the preferred bidders for Window 2 of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producers (IPP) programme that will contribute to South Africa’s energy mix – were announced on Monday. The bidding for window 2 closed on 5 March with the total 79 bids received. These bids amount to 3 255MW while the cap was at 1 275MW. Source: BuaNews Peters appealed to the country’s financial sector to provide financing to bidders. South Africa wants to procure 3 725MW of renewable energy through this process. The programme also seeks to make provision for local content in the provision of alternative energy sources while the bids were evaluated by technical, financial, legal and international reviewers. The minister called on prospective bidders for the remaining three windows that they need not necessary own the land on which projects will operate on. Bidders could co-exist. “We don’t want to lose arable land,” said Peters adding that bidders could share the same piece of land with farmers.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast – January 18th, 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest AUDIO: A Weather Update for January 18th, 2018OH_Ag_Net-1Another chilly day over Ohio today, although not as cold as the past couple of days. South and southwest winds will be in for tomorrow on through the weekend, and that is where we see the big time warming statewide. We should see fully normal to above normal temperatures in over the entire state Friday and Saturday, with 50s likely in most areas for Saturday and perhaps Sunday. We still expect Saturday to be the warmest day of the next several with Sunday a close second. We just feel that better sunshine potential Saturday will give it the edge.Plenty of clouds blanket the state for Sunday with scattered, hit and miss light rains developing and running right on through midday Monday. Moisture totals will be a few hundredths to a tenth or two maximum with coverage of these light spits and sprinkles at 60% of the state. A large part of the coverage will be skewed to the northern half of Ohio. Heavier rains will hold off until later Monday afternoon and mostly Monday evening going through midday Tuesday as our next cold front finally arrives. Rain totals are pegged at .25”-.75” over 80% of the state, unchanged from yesterday’s forecast. Along with the rains, we expect strong south winds averaging 15-30 mph as the front crosses Ohio. The map above is an updated look at potential storm total rains for the Monday-Tuesday period.Colder air comes in behind the front and we can see some lake effect snows linger in northern and especially northeastern Ohio off and on through the balance of Tuesday and most of Wednesday. This will be limited to usual suspect areas, and will not have coverage of any more than 10% of the state. Nothing likely gets south of US 6, and most of the state sees a dry day Wednesday with clouds giving way to afternoon sun. Still, the cool air will take temps back to normal and slightly below normal levels, and a major cold air blast is not likely. We are dry in all areas Thursday and Friday, with clouds increasing late Friday and Saturday.A strong front is making an appearance right at the end of the 10 day window now. We think this is the first wave of a strong storm complex we have been talking about for the period in and around the 28th. So, we look for rain to make a run at far western parts of Ohio next Saturday the 27th. In all reality, though, the bulk of that moisture holds off until Saturday night and goes into the 28th. Rain totals can be from .25”-1” in that period. . Temps look warm enough to have most of this precipitation come as liquid. Then, a second wave may look to arrive later the 28th and holds on through the 29th. That second wave could be worth half to 1 inch of liquid equivalent precipitation, but cold air is marching in too, so we are leaving the door open to some snow from the second part of the system. The rest of the extended period features a clipper near the turn of the month, around the 1st, with some quick hit snow and cold air, and then a cold Canadian high to start off February. So, the pendulum swings wildly on temperatures through the next week or so, but eventually goes to the cold side and stays there a bit longer going into February.last_img read more

Sodhi gunning for more glory

first_imgHe calls for targets, shoots them down with two quick bursts from his shotgun, then prepares for the next targets. Ronjan Singh Sodhi’s sport is just like his life now-a-days – there is no time to rest.Just a day after he returned home from Izmir, Turkey, where he shot the double trap gold at the ISSF World Cup Finals, Sodhi was back in action with his trusted Perazzi weapon at the Dr Karni Singh Shooting Range Wrestling in Tughlakabad.Speaking to MAIL TODAY while taking a break between practice rounds, Sodhi said his focus had not dwindled despite his big achievement.”I had said before I left for the Finals that I had three big competitions coming up and, for me, it’s just one down and two to go (Commonwealth Games and Asian Games). Yes, it was magnificent to win the gold medal, but my focus is very much in place, which is why I’m here practicing the day after I got back home,” Sodhi said.Reflecting on his performance in the Finals, Sodhi said the key to success had been confidence in himself. “It was pretty close at the end of the qualification round, but my competitors started falling behind early in the final. The best thing was the confidence that my training had given me, which was helped by the fact that I was hitting the targets right in the middle,” he said.”It has been a fantastic year for me – out of five ISSF competitions, I have shot well in three.advertisementBefore this gold, I had won the World Cup gold in Lonato ( Italy) and I had shot the world record ( 147 points) in Acapulco ( Mexico) in the first World Cup of the year. So I’m hoping to take this strong form forward with gold at the next two events as well.” On the contribution of shot gun coach Marcello Dradi of Italy, Sodhi said: ” Having somebody as experienced as Marcello around is really a big help. He travels to competitions with us and while he can’t change too much of the technical aspects at this stage, it is a tremendous boost to the mind to have him around and talking to you at the competitions.”His help has also reflected in the records this year – apart from my success, there’s been Manavjit [ Sandhu] winning a World Cup gold in trap, Asher [ Noria] has won the junior double trap at the World Championships and Seema Tomar has also won a silver medal – the first for an Indian woman shotgunner. Marcello has played a major role in taking the Indian shotgun team to an all- time high.” Sodhi also dismissed concerns over the form of Abhinav Bindra and Samaresh Jung, who are going through a lean patch.”Abhinav hasn’t shot in enough competitions since the Olympics to judge his form. I know that he is a big- game player and prepares himself with the mega events in mind. If you look at his past record, the bigger the stage, the better his performance gets.Be it the Olympic gold or the World Championships gold in 2006, he always succeeds on the big stage, so I have no doubt that come Games time, his performance will be at its peak,” he said.”As regards Samaresh Jung, the expectations had been heightened after he won five gold at the 2006 Melbourne Commonwealth Games. He is not in bad form, it is just that other shooters have done better than him in some events. I have no doubts that these champions will underline their greatness,” he said. ” Having said that, I believe the man to watch out for will no doubt be Gagan Narang. Not only is he in the fray for multiple gold medals, he has also been the most consistent among all our shooters.” On the last- minute concerns about the athletes’ accommodation and other facilities at the Commonwealth Games Village, Sodhi said he wasn’t letting them cloud his mind.”There has been too much negative publicity about every aspect of the Games. Yes, there is a little bit of concern about the Village and I would be lying if I said there were no concerns. But my gut feeling says everything is going to be all right. Senior level people have intervened now and I think everything should be in order,” he said.last_img read more

Social harmony progs in Panchayats for Bharat Uday campaign

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 3 (PTI) The Centre has asked states to organise social harmony programmes in all the Gram Panchayats during Gramoday se Bharat Uday Abhiyan to be held between April 14 and 24 and ensure participation of SC, ST and other weaker sections in them.The campaign, to be launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, will begin on April 14 to coincide with the 126th birthday of B R Ambedkar and conclude on April 24 (Panchayati Raj Day). Modi will address villagers in Jamshedpur in Jharkhand on the concluding day.The objective of the campaign is to encourage social harmony, promote farmers progress, improve livelihood of the poor and strengthen Panchayati Raj system by educating them about the various initiatives, programmes and schemes undertaken by the government.”As part of the Abhiyan, social harmony programmes will be organised in all Gram Panchayats and Gram Sabhas all over the country during April 14 and 16. The various activities include garlanding the photograph of B R Ambedkar, taking a pledge to strengthen social harmony, making people aware of Ambedkars thoughts, explaining government schemes to reduce inequality by distribution of literature,” said a senior official from the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment.Also, children will be felicitated at Panchayat level in various fields like education, sports, art and culture. Debates and workshops will also be organised.”We request you to ensure that such social harmony programmes are organsied in all the Gram Panchayats of your state and the participation of SC/ST and other downtrodden population of the Panchayat in these Programmes.advertisement”We also request you to ensure that the concerned officers, functionaries, staff members of Department of Social Welfare, Rural Development and Panchayati Raj and other relevant social sectors attend these meetings to provide information on government schemes to the villagers and interact with them,” said the letter written to all state governments.The government also sought a report on conduct of these programmes by states by April 17.The campaign, will be run jointly by Union Rural Development and Panchayati Raj, Agriculture, Social Justice, Labour and Information and Broadcasting Ministries in coordination with states.The Centre is commemorating Ambedkars 125th birth anniversary year and a National Committee headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been constituted for overseeing the celebrations. PTI PLB SK SRYlast_img read more

PM to meet Rio Olympics-bound athletes tomorrow

first_imgNew Delhi, Jul 3 (PTI) Prime Minister Narendra Modi will meet the Indian athletes who will represent the country at the forthcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PM Modi will interact informally with the sportspersons, and wish them luck for the August 5-21 Games. “The Prime Minister, Shri Narendra Modi, will meet the athletes who shall be representing India at the forthcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro,” an official release said. “Shri Narendra Modi will meet the Olympic Contingent at the Manekshaw Centre in New Delhi on Monday. So far, around 100 athletes from 13 sports disciplines have qualified for the Rio Olympics. “The Prime Minister will interact informally with the sportspersons, and wish them well for their performance in the worlds biggest sporting arena,” the release said. India will be sending its biggest ever contingent in the Olympic Games with more than 100 athletes having already qualified in 13 sporting disciplines. The previous highest was 83 that the country sent in the 2012 Olympics in London. More athletes are likely to qualify in the coming days, and the Sports Ministry and the Indian Olympic Association are expecting more than 110 to represent the country in the Games. PTI PDS CM CMlast_img read more

SPORT-IND-TALKSHOW 2 LAST

first_imgTo a query, Kapil Dev mentioned the names of former To a query, Kapil Dev mentioned the names of former opener Navjot Singh Sidhu and middle-order batsman Ajay Jadeja as the most unorganised off the field. “To call them dirtiest would be harsh but they were very rough off the field and would hurriedly pack the clothes and wear them for days,” Kapil said. Sehwag gave credit to Ganguly and Kumble and also named MS Dhoni, saying that a successful player has a great captain behind him. “Dada had only one motive to win overseas and become number one. Their captaincy was attacking and to back their boys was their strength. I remember having dinner and Kumble told me you would play the next four matches, performance would not matter, just go and give your 100 per cent. I was so content. I made my second triple hundred under Kumble. The seed was sown by Dada and Kumble continued,” Sehwag, recalling his 319 against South Africa in Chennai Test in 2008, said. “Cricket has not changed but its the mindset that has. I never had fear of losing my place as my captain would tell me just go out there and play freely. I could play the fearless cricket because I had my captains backing. “Captain played a big role — be it Sourav, Kumble or MS Dhoni. Every successful player has an equally great captain behind him.” PTI TAP CM CMlast_img read more

Super 30 to now release on July 12

first_imgMumbai: Hrithik Roshan’s long awaited “Super 30” is all set to arrive in the theatres on July 12, the makers have announced. Earlier this month, Hrithik said he was shifting the release date of “Super 30” to save his film from being “desecrated by yet another media circus”. The date was yet to be declared. The actor’s statement came after the release of Kangana Ranaut’s “Mental Hai Kya” was shifted to July 26, only to coincide with the then theatrical arrival of “Super 30”, a claim producer Ekta Kapoor dismissed, saying the decision had nothing to do with Kangana’s equation with Hrithik. Also Read – ‘Will be acting till I die’ “Super 30”, based on the life of mathematician Anand Kumar and his educational programme Super 30, is produced by Nadiadwala Grandson Entertainment and Reliance Entertainment. “Arriving early! #Super30 will be releasing on July 12,” the official handle of Reliance Entertainment tweeted on Saturday. In her response to the earlier change in “Super 30” date, Kangana alleged Hrithik was in on the decision from the beginning, calling the statement a “sob story”. Also Read – ‘Always looking for that one great love’ The film has had a tough birth. Earlier, “Super 30” was to scheduled to be released on January 25, the same date as Kangana’s “Manikarnika: The Queen Of Jhansi”. In 2016, Kangana claimed that she and Hrithik were in a relationship but her “Krrish 3” co-star said it was not true. The fight became public after Hrithik sued her and Kangana counter-sued him. “Super 30”, also featuring Amit Sadh, Mrunal Thakur and Nandish Sandhu, found itself at the centre of controversy over allegations of sexual harassment against the film’s director Vikas Bahl last October.last_img read more