UNDP Out-going Boss Underscores Importance of Decentralization

first_imgThe outgoing Resident Representative of the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), Antonio Vigilante, has underscored the importance of government’s decentralization policy.Mr. Vigilante urged the Ministry of Internal Affairs to continue efforts aimed at capturing citizens’ attention by giving them access to services.He made the comments recently at a dinner held in his honor as he ends his tour of duty in Liberia.During the event held by UNDP management and staff, Mr. Vigilante expressed gratitude to the Liberian Government and its partners for their contributions toward the nation’s development drive.He thanked all Liberians for their contributions during his three-year tenure including the country’s critical period of the Ebola virus disease (EVD).“I have done my part. I want to thank everyone because without the collaboration of Liberians, we couldn’t have been here. It’s my hope that Liberia will continue to grow in peace and strength with several development programs on her shoulders,” he said.The outgoing UN diplomat expressed the hope that the government will remain on the path of growth and development.‘With resilience, the country will be better; and we need to achieve women’s empowerment, government reform transformation, and job creation among other issues,” he said to the delight of the guests.The program was attended by an array of government officials, UN partners, Members of the Diplomatic Corps, staff of UNDP, friends and many well-wishers.In separate remarks, guests spoke highly of Mr. Vigilante’s contributions especially to the fight against the 2014 deadly Ebola virus crisis.UNDP Country Director Kamil Kamaluddeen described him as “a person who is development-oriented.”While in the country, Mr. Vigilante helped set up of the Community Based Initiative, which provided the stage for community participation in the fight against the EVD, as well as the country’s decentralization process aimed at providing municipal services in the 15 counties.Mr. Vigilante was appointed by the UN Secretary General in 2014 as UNDP Resident Representative. He also served in other capacities as DSRSG for the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) for Recovery and Governance, as well as UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator.Mr. Vigilante has already left the country. He has worked in several countries for the United Nations for over 35 years and is now retiring.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Fairview RCMP Searching For Missing 13 Year-Old Girl

first_imgFAIRVIEW, A.B. – Police in Fairview are searching for a 13 year-old girl who went missing on Tuesday.On May 17th, just before 2:00 p.m. the Fairview RCMP received a complaint that 13 year-old Sarah Zylstra was last seen at her home on Range Road 20 in the Municipal District of Fairview at approximately 12:30 a.m. that morning. She is described as Aboriginal, 5’4″ tall, weighing 107 lbs. She was last seen wearing blue jeans, a rose-coloured long sleeve shirt, and black shoes.The Fairview RCMP along with assistance of the Grande Prairie RCMP Police Dog Service and Peace River Search and Rescue started a ground search around her property.  The RCMP are preparing for a more intensive ground search today.- Advertisement -Police are asking for the public’s assistance in that if Sarah Zylstra is spotted to contact the Fairview RCMP immediately so that she can be returned home safely.UPDATE: Sarah Zylstra has been found safe and unharmed.last_img read more

Russian Premier League adopts ‘passionate bear’ logo

first_img0Shares0000Russia is following England’s lead with an animal logo for its top football league © AFP / Alexander NEMENOVMOSCOW, Russian Federation, Apr 16 – Russia’s Premier League is following the lead of its English counterparts by launching an animal logo to win over fans: a red-eyed bear.While the English top flight has its iconic royal blue lion, Russia has launched a logo of its own national animal just two months ahead of the World Cup kick-off in the country. The Moscow design studio behind Monday’s re-branding announcement described the animal on its website as: “A bear with eyes burning with passion.”Russia’s club football has struggled for recognition in the post-Soviet era despite being ranked sixth by European governing body UEFA.Its reputation has been blotted by hooliganism and ramshackle stadiums built by Communist Party planners who valued austerity over comfort.Teams such as Spartak Moscow and Zenit Saint Peterburg have faithful followings at home but are hardly a draw outside Russia.The Russian Premier League hopes that is about to change.The infusion of 12 new or refurbished arenas now opening at great expense for the World Cup is set to transform how the game looks and feels.The Russian football association has started making a profit and is thinking up ways to capture a broader audience on TV.This is where the black bear comes in.The fierce looking beast — replete with blood-red triangular eyes — is meant to replace a bland 17-year-old logo featuring the map of Russia on a ball.A spokesman for the Premier League said it may still undergo some finishing touches depending on what team owners and the fans say.The league said in a statement it was hoping to use the new brand to “help create entertaining, competitive and commercially successful” football.The reception so far has been one of pleasant surprise.“The new Russian Premier League logo is actually not that bad,” popular sports commentator Vasily Utkin wrote in a blog.Editors behind Moscow’s Sportbox.ru website immediately ran a poll asking: “What looks sharper — the English lion or the Russian bear?”The bear won by a handsome margin despite some fans saying in their responses that it looked either psychedelic or “on drugs”.Russia has turned to its national symbol in times of need in the past.The ruling United Russia party adopted the animal in its logo as part of its appeal to voters in the first years of President Vladimir Putin’s rule.It was the mascot of Moscow’s 1980 Summer Olympics and is the symbol of Russia’s special forces and various army units.Utkin, though, admitted that a spunky new bear on its own will probably not do all that much to make Russian football more attractive.“But no logo ever did that — not in flourishing leagues or in problematic ones like ours,” Utkin wrote.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Prep Soccer

first_img2. Hart11-2-01 Upset by Quartz Hill in Hart tournament quarterfinals. 3. Westlake6-1-23 Hoping to be well rested, not rusty after 20-day layoff. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson 6. Sylmar11-1-46 Benjamin Martin leading large group of scorers. 7. Hoover10-2-07 Begins Pacific League play Tuesday against Pasadena. 8. Burroughs7-2-28 Hoping to avoid repeat of last seasons slow start in league. 9. Crespi8-5-0NR Buena tournament champion. tab!10. Saugus7-5-2NR Slow starters getting stronger with return to health. 4. Palmdale11-0-34 PKs keeping Falcons out of tournament finals 5. El Camino Real12-2-15 Tuning up for league with wins in Hawaii. center_img SEVEN-DAY FORECASTPotential hero Senior forward William Gutierrez leads the Rio Mesa of Oxnard boys with 11 goals in 10 games. Another big game from Gutierrez today against defending Pacific View League champion Pacifica of Oxnard would help put the Spartans in good position in the league race after last season’s second-place finish. Boys’ game of the week Westlake at Newbury Park, Wednesday, 6 p.m. The defending Marmonte League champion Warriors return from a lengthy break by facing this season’s early league leader. HE’S A KEEPER Last week, San Fernando won its first tournament in three tries this season and the Tigers say the victory coincided with the return of senior goalkeeper Jose Salmeron. Salmeron, who had been academically ineligible, was in goal Thursday when San Fernando shut out Saugus 2-0 in the championship game of the Hart of Newhall tournament. “He gets my vote for MVP,” San Fernando coach Francis Melendez said. In addition to making some spectacular plays in the second half of the final, in which he shared goalkeeping duties with Orlando Cardenas, Salmeron came up big in the semifinals. After a scoreless tie forced the semifinal against undefeated Palmdale to be decided on penalty kicks, Salmeron blocked two shots during the shootout, which the Tigers won by one. “Our scorers get most of the attention,” Melendez said. “They’re good, they deserve it, but Jose has been great. He’s my tournament MVP.” Salmeron is part of a stingy Tigers defense that has held opponents to 11 goals in 17 games. TALENT OVERFLOW On a team with two returning goalkeepers, freshman Andre Yanez has managed to get most of the starts in the net for Burroughs of Burbank. “He has been pretty consistent,” Burroughs coach Mike Kodama said. But senior Kevin Cadenas and junior Tony Castro are talented options, leaving Kodama with a difficult decision regarding playing time. “That’s basically how it is with out the whole team,” Kodama said. We’re so deep. Whoever is hot is who’s in. We have a lot of good players.” The Indians depth is evident in leading scorer Justin Zepedas’ relatively low total of seven goals. Carlos Navarro is close behind in a lineup in which nine different players have scored. With an abundance of skilled players, the Indians expect to contend in their final season in the Foothill League. Burroughs, with 12 returnees, has already matched its win total of a year ago when the Indians did not qualify for the postseason. This season’s 7-2-2 record marks Burroughs’ best start since 1992-93 (8-2-1). BOYS’ LEAGUE UPDATES FOOTHILL Saugus, the Hart of Newhall tournament runner-up, wasn’t the Foothill’s only team finding a positive last week. Valencia matched last season’s victory total by defeating La Salle 3-1 in a consolation game. Valencia’s only victory last season was by forfeit. The Vikings have a new coach, Tony Scalercio, and Irvin Quinonez leads the team in scoring. Hart of Newhall senior forward Matt Valaika enters Friday’s league opener with 25 goals in 13 games, three shy of the school record and two short of his league-leading total from last season. FREEWAY Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies is used to holding its own against fellow magnet schools, but the Knights found success on a larger scale last week. Even though it was against a junior varsity lineup, SOCES’s 2-1 victory Friday over Monroe of North Hills JV entry in the Monroe Tournament ranks as one of the Knights biggest accomplishments. Coach Mark Sobel said, the victory win was only the second in program history against a large school, and first in 10 years. “All the other schools (at the tournament) have 3,000-plus students,” said Sobel, whose school has about 800 students. We want the challenge. We want to be able to play on the same field as the regular-sized schools.” MISSION After a slow start, St. Francis of La Canada Flintridge appears back in its form of perennial contender. The Golden Knights finished third at last week’s Buena Tournament in Ventura, then opened league Tuesday with a 3-0 victory over Alemany of Mission Hills. Sophomore forward Nick Posthuma, a first-year varsity player, provided two goals and an assist in the victory that improved St. Francis to 5-6-2. The Golden Knights have yet to play with senior standout Scott Stephens who was recovering from a football injury and this week is visiting colleges. Despite graduating several players from last season’s Div. II co-champion lineup Loyola of Los Angeles doesn’t appear ready to make things any easier on Mission opponents this year. The Cubs are on a hot streak that includes four consecutive shutouts last week at the West Coast Classic. VALLEY MISSION Sylmar claimed its second tournament championship of the season. The Spartans, who started the season by winning the Brandt Burroughs Tournament, won the Locke/Jordan tournament by defeating Jefferson on Friday in a game that was decided on penalty kicks. League play begins next week. Kennedy of Granada Hills and Monroe of North Hills are semifinalists in the Monroe tournament. The final is noon Saturday at Monroe. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Joanne’s First Date was the first step to a new life!

first_imgChatty Donegal woman Joanne Cullen seemed to have found her perfect match on First Dates Ireland last week, but what she really found was the inspiration to completely change her life, writes Rachel McLaughlin.Buncrana native Joanne Cullen was paired with talkative Dubliner Max in last weeks’ show and conversation flowed easily over dinner. The pair seemed to hit it off and decided to continue their date into the wee hours, but what happened next? Donegal Woman caught up with Joanne this week to find out.Joanne, 35, and Max, 32, decided that their connection wasn’t strong enough to warrant a second date, but Joanne gained a huge personal boost from the programme. Taking on the nerve-wracking task of dating on national television gave her the confidence to quit her corporate job and travel across the world to learn yoga.Joanne Cullen“I don’t know if the show gave me a leap of faith or it was a trigger for the change – it gave me a massive boost of confidence,” Joanne said.“I was a Programme Manager in UCD. I handed in my notice on the 30th of September, wrote a post-it note and sent a picture of it to my brother and sister to tell them I had resigned from my job and booked a ticket to Hawaii,” she said.Joanne’s Post-It NoteJoanne went off to study yoga in Hawaii and the US and is now about to begin a new life as a yoga teacher in Dun Laoghaire. Many months have passed since Joanne ascended the famous lift of The Gibson Hotel, but she looks back on the day with positive memories.“I would definitely go on it again, if they let me back that is!,” she said.Joanne remembers having to go up and down the lift multiple times for the best camera shots, but once she sat down for dinner the date was completely natural.Cameras are hidden out of sight in small white pods around the restaurant so daters forget they are there, Joanne said. To viewers at home, Joanne definitely seemed at ease as she connected with Max.Image: First Dates Ireland“I didn’t even eat! The nerves and the excitement and energy all combine into one,” she admits. Joanne didn’t actually sign herself up for the reality show. She now has her best friend Suzanne to thank for the life-changing experience.“I know the guy I went out with, Max’s friend put him up for it too. I thought to myself, you never know, these are opportunities to meet people.”“Because dating in Ireland has become so online I think it’s great to sit down and talk to someone in that way.“Everyone on the show is on the same boat, but no one knows where to go. First Dates enables that fire. Some people have never dated before being on that show and I think it’s a really positive thing,” Joanne said. The romance of the restaurant is often short-lived once couples go out to the real world, but it’s all part of the fun, Joanne said. She and Max did go partying after their meal, but realised it wasn’t meant to be.“I think the environment really does lend itself to the whole romance thing, you get carried away by it. There’s a lot of other things going on in the background and it’s very well edited.“It’s all good fun and in a national sense it’s great to inject a bit of humor into life when there is so much negativity happening. Giving someone a bit of fun is the most important part life.Joanne’s date Max. Image: First Dates Ireland“Everyone seems pretty laid back on the show because the COCO Television crew are so great. There is a massive crew of people working there and they have so much to do but Mateo and the waiters are so great. They all keep you as calm as possible and they are so caring.”“They have great fun and put so much energy into making the matches. We were so well looked after. I got about 10 calls before and after the show to make sure everything was okay.”The positivity of First Dates has inspired many people to turn their lives around, Joanne revealed. “A lot of people were pushed out of their comfort zone and then feel they can do anything,” she said.Joanne and Adriene Mishler at The Blanton Museum of ArtJoanne herself took off for three weeks to sunny Hawaii, followed by a week in San Francisco and a week in Austin, Texas. She had a special experience any yogi would cherish in Texas, where she practiced with world-famous teacher Adriene Mishler at The Blanton Museum of Art.“Adriene is such a beautiful person, she’s a really kind and caring human being. That definitely was one of my best memories from the trip,” Joanne said.Joanne at The Blanton Museum of ArtIn the coming weeks Joanne will begin to teach yoga in Dublin and dreams of setting up her own studio one day. This new career path could also bring her back to Buncrana one day, she said, while she will always look back on that first date as the first step to a brand new life.Joanne’s First Date was the first step to a new life! was last modified: April 6th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:first dates irelandjoanne cullenTVYogalast_img read more

Population dip has La Mirada officials puzzled

first_imgLA MIRADA – City officials are scratching their heads over the new population figures from the state Department of Finance that show the numbers are down by 395. “I want to know where the heck they went,” said Councilman Hal Malkin. “I am totally shocked,” Malkin said. “This might have to be looked at. It might be a good summertime job for me to figure out how they get this data.” La Mirada’s population decreased from 50,188 in 2005 to 49,793. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsThe Finance Department determines its numbers from changes in the housing stock, including new construction, demolitions and housing unit conversions. Malkin said he worries that if the numbers continue to fall, the city could lose money from state funds that are distributed based on population. Cities with populations above 50,000 have more opportunities, although there also can be more paperwork involved. For example, cities can apply directly to the federal government to obtain federal Community Development Block Grant instead of going through Los Angeles County. But in La Mirada’s case, the city never took advantage of the opportunities, so the reduction will have no effect, City Manager Andrea Travis said. “We never changed any of our practices,” Travis said. “It was partly a function of time and the benefits didn’t outweigh the costs. “We also were so close to 50,000 that we didn’t want to make a lot of changes in case something like \ occurred,” she said. La Mirada isn’t the only city with a population decrease. La Habra Heights’ population fell from 6,156 to 6,109. Its city manager, Ron Bates, said he isn’t surprised, saying that in his community children grow up and the parents remain behind. Still, Bates said, he expects the city’s population to increase in the future. “We anticipate continued development of new homes in the Heights. As those new homes are developed, that will more than replace the 47 people.” mike.sprague@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Get me whatever I, er, you want

first_imgT’is the season to annoy the people we love and, in turn, be annoyed by them. Not that this is deliberate, mind you. It’s part of the seasonal sport known as holiday shopping. Herewith, some common grievances. “You’re impossible” or “hard to please” are among the epithets widely heard at this time of year. On behalf of those implicated, I’m often amused by the stubbornness of our accusers. I gladly provide hints and clues to those who ask; I’m forever searching for the best strawberry jam and Medjool dates. But how often do our critics come through with the very thing they begged to know? Approximately never. Then last week, another friend suggested that we modify our holiday exchange of gifts. “Malawi,” she proposed as an alternative. She asked that I make a donation, if I were so inclined, to feed people in Malawi. At first I bristled at the idea. A charitable donation is lovely, to be sure. But aren’t there charities closer to home that urgently need our dollars? Further, the request seemed remarkably close to dictating how I should spend my money, an odd overtone for a gift. Yet that’s the nature of donations. Unlike tangible gifts, donations are cash without the window dressing. Of course, I came around. My friend’s idea made perfect sense, summoning us to less greed. That I ultimately nixed it, however, reflected something else. I had already bought her gift and, separately, chose to donate to Katrina victims. Which gets to the heart of the matter. Gifts can be an expression of many things – thanks, whimsy, thoughtfulness, elan. While suggestions may help, they can also thwart the giver’s need to find, or make, or choose something of one’s own devising. This may be a point of pride, a show of insight or a gesture of solidarity. Suffice it to say, gifts often function on multiple levels, many with subtext. So, how to negotiate the thickets of gift-giving this season? Listen closely to talk of slippers and charity. Consider dates and jam. Then do what gift-givers have done for years – whatever you please.— Joan Silverman is a writer in Boston.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake Do people really want gift ideas, or does such intervention undermine their wish to surprise and impress? I’d say the latter. The perfect gift isn’t necessarily the thing you want; it’s the thing you didn’t know you wanted, which requires both stealth and cleverness on the part of the giver. “Slippers,” the message proclaimed on my voice mail. It was a friend announcing her discovery of the ultimate comfy footwear, which she was giving her sister for Christmas. Perhaps I, too, might like a pair? I quickly jotted a response, defending my favorite moccasins and thanking her nonetheless. “Dear Foiler/Spoiler,” she replied, exasperated, “You’re just the sort of person I send moose lawn ornaments to!”last_img read more

Raiders’ GM Mike Mayock a personality match for Jon Gruden

first_imgALAMEDA — Jon Gruden has a new sounding board, and this one just might be able to keep up with him.Whether Mike Mayock has the goods to be an NFL general manager based on 15 years as a television analyst remains to be seen. But it does appear Gruden has someone to work with who may be as manic and obsessive as he is. Click HERE if you’re unable to view the gallery on your mobile device. When Gruden was initially paired with G.M. Reggie McKenzie, the hope was it could be a …last_img

It’s Official: Saturn’s Rings Are Young

first_img(Visited 1,547 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 There’s no stretching the truth any more. Cassini data have led all the ringmasters to the conclusion that the rings of Saturn are not billions of years old.Saturn’s rings seen from Voyager 2, 1981For over 15 years, Creation-Evolution Headlines has reported the tug-of-war between planetary scientists on the age of Saturn’s rings (e.g., 2/12/02). Indications that the rings are much younger than Saturn’s assumed age (4.5 billion years) go back to the Voyager missions. Several lines of evidence pointed to youth, but planetary scientists tugged back at the evidence, inventing ways to keep the rings billions of years old. Now, they have given up. Reality won the match: the rings are young!Paul Voosen reports in Science Magazine, “Saturn’s rings are solar system newcomers.”The rings of Saturn seem like permanent fixtures in the solar system, firing the imaginations of poets and scientists alike. But observations made this year by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft in the final months of its existence, and reported here last week at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), show they are surprisingly youthful: Until a few hundred million years ago, they did not exist. Saturn acquired its jewels relatively late in life. If any astronomers had gazed at the sky in the time of the dinosaurs, they might have seen a bare and boring Saturn.Cassini high dives through Saturn rings in 2017 (JPL).Of course, to moyboy scientists, ‘young’ is a relative term. The new estimate of 200 million years max doesn’t sound young to most people. It is, however, only about 5% of the assumed age of the solar system. That conclusion leaves secular planetary scientists in a quandary: it will now require ad hoc special conditions to explain the rings in a separate theory, apart from the general theory of the solar system’s formation. Not only that, it will require a relatively recent event that makes humans look special, because we live in a rare epoch when the rings exist to be observed and enjoyed by sentient beings.The brightness of the rings was a primary evidence for youth, because rings should get dirty over time from meteorite bombardment. Added to that, the B-ring—thickest of all—turns out to be less dense than thought. The clincher came from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA), which measured far more dust than expected:After 12 years of painstaking measurements and analysis, the Cosmic Dust Analyzer, a Cassini experiment that measures small particles, has found that the micrometeorite flux is large—“inconsistent with an old ring,” says Sascha Kempf, a space physicist at the University of Colorado (CU) in Boulder who led the work. Dust from the outer solar system moves more slowly than expected, which allows Saturn’s gravity to pull more of it in. The flux, about 10 times higher than estimates from before the Cassini mission, suggests a ring age of between 150 million and 300 million years, or even younger. “Our measurement is the most direct way you can measure it,” Kempf adds. “There’s not much you can do about it. It has to be young.”Dr. Larry Esposito enjoying Cassini’s first view of Saturn’s rings, July 1, 2004 (photo by David Coppedge)How are the scientists dealing with this quandary? Basically, Voosen writes, they are appealing to the Stuff Happens Law (i.e., chance). Leading ringmasters Larry Esposito and Jeff Cuzzi have been worrying about this for decades. Eleven years ago, Esposito proposed a thick B-ring to keep at least that part going for a billion years (2/04/16). Now look what they say:In the early 1980s, Esposito says, the two Voyager spacecraft flew past Saturn and returned data that seemed to point toward a low ring mass—and a possible youthful age. But Voyager scientists had a hard time coming up with a compelling scenario to explain it—the notion that a saturnian moon might have shattered at a time when the solar system would have had few potential asteroids or comets to ram into it seemed far-fetched. “The best idea we had then was that we’re just lucky,” Esposito says. “I’m back to square one.”Scientists have only begun to study how the ring-forming collision could have happened. “Part of the reluctance for everyone to leap off this bridge into the unknown is we haven’t had any kind of feasible explanation,” Cuzzi says. It’s time for new ideas, he adds. “The solar system could be full of surprises like this.”Cuzzi’s last statement could be taken as a covering model for future upsets. Or, it could be taken as an indication that planetary scientists don’t understand the solar system as much TV specials make it seem.The situation is analogous to the fossil record for Darwinism. Theory predicts gradual change and clear lines of descent, but the evidence keeps showing abrupt appearance, living fossils and ‘convergent evolution’ (hear Casey Luskin talk about this on ID the Future). As I see it, the evidence is baffling for Darwinians because Darwinism is false. Similarly, the youthful rings of Saturn are baffling to secular planetary scientists because the solar system is young.I had occasion to meet these scientists when I was at JPL, and I spoke with them on rare occasions. I was responsible for their computers at their universities, and saw them often in periodic Project Science Group meetings at the lab. They were each amicable and pleasant in person. I listened to their presentations with great interest, wondering which view would prevail. It was clear to me that nothing would dislodge their belief in billions of years, but there was a subtext that it would be very troubling to them if the rings turned out to be young. These quotes show that to be the case: they are flummoxed and dumbfounded by the evidence. They have no explanation, and they admit it.I’ve been intrigued by this mystery ever since I read about it in Astronomy Magazine and Sky & Telescope back in the 1980’s, so it was good to actually meet the experts in person. In my non-JPL science presentations, I’ve long used Saturn’s rings as one of many examples that the solar system is young. While maintaining my humility as not in their league regarding math and physics, I do find some gratification, at least in this instance, at being found right in the end.last_img read more

Play Your Part TV series: episode 14 synopsis

first_imgHere’s a little taste of what episode 14 of the Play Your Part TV Series has in store for you this Saturday. This week you get to meet three women who have been working tirelessly to make a difference in their communities.Brand South Africa reporterThe Play Your Part TV series is coming at you again this Saturday, same time at 6pm and same place on SABC 2. Here’s a quick look at what episode 14 has in store for you on 13 January 2018.Nosipho Community FoundationNosipho Ngcobo, the founder of the Nosipho Community Foundation, can often be found strolling along the streets of Durban as a Good Samaritan on the move. Through her organisation, Ngcobo offers a helping hand to the homeless, providing shelter, food and employment opportunities where she can.New Jerusalem Home for ChildrenNew Jerusalem Home for Children just outside Tembisa, Gauteng, recently hosted the South African National Men’s Hockey Team. We speak to Phina Mojapelo, the social work manager for the children’s home, about the experience and what the organisation is all about.El TheosThrough her extensive experience in helping the El Theos organisation, Bijou Bakole, has taken it upon herself to provide support to a few young boys in coping with their challenging domestic circumstances.Tune in and be inspiredThe Play Your Part TV Series airs at 6pm on Saturdays on SABC 2.To get involved in playing your part in South Africa you can:Check out the conversation on Twitter: #GetInvolved; orFind out about initiatives on Play Your Part here.Tell us how you Play Your Part through our social media channels:Follow us on Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA;Follow Brand South Africa on Twitter: @Brand_SA;Like us on Facebook: Official Brand South Africa.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more