Wizz Air has announced plans to introduce a new ch

first_imgWizz Air has announced plans to introduce a new cheap flight to Dortmund in Germany, from its Budapest base in October.Services will run three times a week and complement existing Wizz Air flights to Dortmund from Katowice.As well as adding the new cheap flights to Budapest, Wizz plans to increase frequency on the Polish service.Budapest will be the ninth destination served by Wizz at Dortmund, with flights to Gdansk, Poznan, Warsaw, Wroclaw, Cluj, Bucharest and Sofia, as well as Katowice, already available.This announcement follows news from easyJet that it plans to cut the number of flights to Dortmund currently offered.The carrier has opened a 90-day consultation with its staff at the German airport to decide whether or not to close its Dortmund base after revealing it will cut 50 percent of all winter flights to the city.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Map RelatedWizz Air launches flights from Warsaw to RomeWizz Air will introduce cheap flights to Rome Ciampino Airport from Warsaw in September.Wizz Air to launch new flights to GermanyWizz Air will introduce two new flights to Germany in the springWizz Air unveils 15 new routesWizz Air has announced plans to expand its schedule with 15 new routes over the next six months.last_img read more

The Invisible Graffiti of Angkor Wat

Angkor Wat may be covered in graffiti—but don’t worry, it’s invisible. Built in the early 12th century, Cambodia’s architecturally iconic temple is known for its intricate carvings, some of them stretching nearly a kilometer in length. But most archaeologists believe that parts of the temple were once painted as well. So when scientists noticed faint traces of red and black pigment on the walls of several rooms in Angkor Wat, they snapped pictures with a bright flash and used a tool called decorrelation stretch analysis to digitally enhance the images. Previously used to highlight subtle color differences in images of the martian landscape taken by NASA’s Opportunity rover, this type of analysis can reveal colors too faint or faded to be seen with the naked eye. When the researchers applied it to their photos of Angkor Wat, they found more than 200 images of boats, deities, buildings, and animals—like the elephants above (inset)—drawn on the walls throughout the temple, they report today in Antiquity. Most of the paintings are haphazardly arranged and appear to be graffiti left by visitors after Angkor Wat was first abandoned in 1431. But one group of carefully drawn scenes, located in the highest tier of one of Angkor Wat’s towers, might be the remains of a 16th century restoration program, when the complex was transformed from a Hindu temple into a Buddhist shrine. The previously lost images could give archaeologists new insight into this little-known period in Cambodia’s history. read more